The Rastafarian Movement in Jamaica Essay

The Rastafarian Movement in Jamaica Essay

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Introduction and Background

The aim of this research proposal is to gain a full understanding of the cultural experience that was experienced by the researcher. Each person was afforded the task in choosing a place to visit that would exhibit the cultural practices. For the purposes of this research the Bobo Shanti village was picked because of interest in the Rastafarian culture. The visit was made to the Bobo Shanti camp in Bull Bay, St. Andrew in order to find information for this research paper. The Rastafarian movement was formed by Jamaicans Leonard Howell, Joseph Hibbert, Archibald Dunkley and Robert Hinds. They are said to have received revelations that Haile Selassie was the messiah of black people and had ministries preaching this alongside ideas of repatriation to Africa and denunciation of colonial rule.
The Bobo Shanti was formed by Emmanuel Charles Edwards in 1958, who was a former member of the Ethiopian World Federation. The name Bobo Shanti came out of a meeting held to discuss the issue of repatriation and Jamaican independence. The Bobo Shanti camp was first located at 54b Spanish Town Road, after participating in a repatriation march which ended in violent actions and also because of unfair treatment by police forces this settlement had to be removed, which caused them to relocate to Bull Bay in 1972. The Bobo Shanti share in the same teaching of other Rastafarians but their doctrines differ somewhat as they consider Haile Selassie to be only one a trinity that includes Marcus Garvey and Prince Emmanuel. They often refer to Prince Emmanuel Charles Edwards as the black Christ and alongside him Haile Selassie I. They have been able to raise their profile by prominent members of the school leaving and using thei...


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...te this the Rastafarian culture has been entrenched with the very fabric of Jamaican life. The world now associates the term Rastafari with Jamaica.







Conclusion

Based on observation the Rastafarian faith is one that has been greatly misunderstood by the Jamaican population as well as the world at large. The traditional Rastafarians are philosophers and ideologists that have impacted various cultures with their teachings. They have brought about concepts that have not only aided their cause but the cause of others. Their way of life is humble and exemplifies the need for one to be self sufficient. They have brought a truly rich cultural and artistic legacy such as Reggae music which has impacted the lives of others. This sis become a part of the Jamaican culture and lends for easy identification of Jamaica by many foreigners and has sustained over the years.

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