The Problem Of Sub Saharan Africa Essay

The Problem Of Sub Saharan Africa Essay

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Despite the improvements within the last decade the vast majority of sub-Saharan Africa remains corrupt. Corruption is a complex phenomenon. The inability for the country as a whole to solve their own issues is indeed the reason the country till this day is considered a developing nation. But as much as sub-Saharan is said to be ethical, stats and numbers illustrate many forms of corruption. Corruption within the country’s policies, bureaucratic traditions, political development, and social history. The aim of this paper is to elaborate and construe the many forms of corruption being practiced in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, how it creates everlasting effects on the nation 's people specifically focusing on the Education, Healthcare, and Food sectors.
In order to understand the region and how it operates I will provide a concise brief of the countries characteristics. The population of South Africa (sub-Saharan Africa) is currently 53,140,000 (CIA, 2016).However the population growth rate is one point thirty three percent as of 2015, according to the CIA Country report (2016). The Government type in South Africa is a parliamentary republic. Guyy Scott is the current President in sub-Saharan Africa. The legal system practiced is a mixed legal system of Roman-Dutch civil law, English common law, and customary law (CIA, 2016). The continent is often associated with war, disease, hunger and squalor. Africa is actually one of the poorest regions in the world and in fact millions of its inhabitants live in poverty, inequality, are unemployed, lack access to clean water and sufficient health care. Unemployment rate in SSA within the year 2015 was at twenty- five point one. Not to mention that the economic growth has decelerated in r...


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... The Burkina Faso’s ten-year plan for basic education that was launched in 2001 is an example or product of what happens when a policy gains attention and retains sufficient funding (UNESCO,2008). The policy targets reducing geographic disparities by setting aside additional resources for twenty provinces. With this in mind, eco¬nom¬ic growth in¬creases the tax base and boosts state revenues, which can be used for the sus¬tain¬able financing of social bud¬gets and in-vest¬ment. Thus reducing de¬pen¬dence on in¬ter¬na¬tional aid, Private agencies, Ngo Organizations. In fact Africa continues to rely heavily on foreign aid and the region is the largest recipient of total official development assistance (ODA) but nonetheless remains insufficient (United Nations, 2007).Given these points Africans ultimately need to feel secure in all three sectors mentioned above.




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