The Importance Of Family

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Family has played an intricate role in the development of the society in which we live. The diversity in which families are formed is now becoming even more diverse with the American culture, which is changing at a rapid pace. Diverse cultures coupled with social economic challenges are key contributors to the dramatic change to the institution of family. With these challenges facing the institution of family, this closely tightknit unit which has been the cornerstone of American society has diminishing from a traditional standpoint. Non-kinship family networks like the one described in Karen V. Hansen’s “The Cranes, An Absorbent Safety Net,” goes against the norm of the common institution of family within America. Although the Crane family…show more content…
Hansen’s “The Cranes, An Absorbent Safety Net,” she details a case study conducted with Patricia Crane as she divulges about the non-kinship extended family network she is the leader of. Hanson’s case study uses a “deficit comparison model “to explain nontraditional family structures based on “relationships that are neither genetically nor legally bound.” All of the members within Patricia extended family are dependent on each other in one way or another to endure the “challenges of their daily lives.” Daunting tasks as providing daily meals, and responsibilities of caring for the children and elderly dependents of this extended family is a shared responsibility. The cranes network from a traditional standpoint, goes against the grain of a common “nuclear family” consisting of two parents and dependent children. With the ever-changing society and culture within America, the very definition of family has changed immensely. Social economic restraints coupled with individuals in the family not holding their obligations, force families such as the Cranes to “adapt social constructionism.” This allows them to cope with their everyday individual issues by solving them as a collective family unit. The Crane’s unique family situation of the non-kinship is defined by the article “Constructing family: a topology of voluntary kin” as “persons outside of blood and legal ties who are considered as family.” Although the traditional nuclear family and a non-kinship family…show more content…
These moments of instability and total breakdown of marriages and relationships become a learned behavior by the children and the cycle repeats itself in adulthood, as they engage in their personal relationships. As the institution of marriage and the family become more fragmented from generation to generation, life in America for children is not as good as we would like to believe. In the article written by Stephanie Coontz “The Way We Never Were: Introduction” is she mentions certain disturbing statistics involving the neglect towards children in America. For example Coontz notes Americas neglect to properly vaccinate children according to statistics our nations “children age two and under is worse than only two Western hemisphere nations, Bolivia and Haiti.” Considering the fact that America has more violence per capita than other established Western nations, this considerable exposure to violent acts has desensitized children leading them to become violent. Examining exposure to violence at a young age shows itself w in our life only and will you will you and you hen the children become adolescents as statistics have shown that “homicide involving American teens have seen a 12% increase in violent crimes in 1984 to 1980.” American teens also have seen an increase in teen
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