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The Functions of Proteins

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The Functions of Proteins Introduction Protein accounts for about three-fourths of the dry matter in human tissues other than fat and bone. It is a major structural component of hair, skin, nails, connective tissues, and body organs. It is required for practically every essential function in the body. Proteins are made from the following elements; carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and often sulphur and phosphorus. Proteins cannot be stored except in eggs and seeds and they form the body's main structural elements and are found in every cell and tissue. The human body uses proteins for growth and to build and repair bones, muscles, tissue, skin, internal organs and blood. Hormones, antibodies and the enzymes that regulate the body's chemical reactions are all made of protein. Without the right proteins, blood won't clot properly and cuts won't heal and if carbohydrates and fat can't meet your energy needs, proteins can be broken down and used as a source of emergency energy. So this makes protein very crucial for your health. Each protein is a large complex molecule; these molecules are made up of a string of amino acids. There are 20 different amino acids that occur naturally to form proteins and they all have the same basic structure. The 20 amino acids the body needs can be linked in thousands of different ways to form thousands of different proteins, each with a unique function in the body. Both the amino acids manufactured in the liver and those derived from the breakdown of the proteins we eat are absorbed into the blood stream and taken up by the cells and tissues to build new proteins as needed. The functions of ... ... middle of paper ... ...st layer of human skin, hair, and nails, and the scales, hooves, and feathers of animals. It twists into a regularly repeating coil called an alpha helix. Serving to protect the body against the environment, keratin is completely insoluble in water. Its many contains disulphide bonds which make it an extremely stable protein. References Website’s used: www.Intelihealth.com, www.dentistry.leeds.ac.uk/biochem/lectures/nutrition, www.healthy.net/library/books/haas/funct.htm, www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/bio99/bio99395.htm, www.bmb.leeds.ac.uk/tpdg/hglobin.htm, Books: Title: AS Biology, Author: Indge/Rowland/Baker, Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton Title: Human Biology, Author: G.D. Chalk/G.P.J. Baster, Publisher: E. Arnold Software’s: Microsoft Encarta 2000 Encyclopedia Deluxe Version
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