Tale Of Two Cities Comparison Analysis

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“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…” Charles Dickens began his remarkable novel, The Tale of Two Cities, in this way (Dickens 1). His famous beginning has been quoted by different people countless times. This opening is counted as a classic because it makes people think they already read the whole book just by reading those words. It perfectly covers the main theme in the novel A Tale of Two Cities. The novel depicts London and Paris in the late eighteenth century, and especially focuses on the French Revolution. As a prolific author, Charles Dickens wrote many memorable works. However, A Tale of Two Cities is one of his most outstanding novels not just because it conveys the dual nature of of this epoch. The themes of resurrection,…show more content…
In A Tale of Two Cities, the theme of resurrection is evident on a personal level and on a social level and brings the story together. Sydney Carton, a sloppily dressed, befuddled lawyer in the book, was the most complex and dramatic character, but was also the best example of the theme of resurrection on the personal level. Charles Dickens described Carton’s appearance as careless and slovenly (Dickens 82). Although the novel describes him as a heroic figure by the end of the book, his first impression was not the description of a stereotypical hero (Keck). Dickens made him act like a normal young man. His early life was full of indolence, lethargy and depression. However, this lazy, drunk, and unpolished “gentleman” started to change at the moment he found out he loved Lucie Manette. He started to notice his true value inside, and realize that the world was not as bad as he thought before.…show more content…
Dickens used his novel to show that love can transform into a positive or negative emotion. The love between Lucie Manette and Dr. Manette, as well as that of Charles Darnay and Lucie and indeed many other characters are the examples of love that turns into a positive emotion. The strongest example of love in the book is that of Lucie and her father. Dr. Manette had been kept in the Bastille for eighteen years. Lucie used her love and patience to take care of Dr. Manette, and brought his soul back to his body. Also, the people who put Dr. Manette in the prison were the father and uncle of Charles Darnay, the person Lucie loved. It was hard for Dr. Manette to accept the fact that the person his daughter loved had the most horrible family. However, because of his love for Lucie, Dr. Manette decided to abate his hate, and tried to bless Lucie and Charles. In the first part of book three, Dr. Manette even helped to protect Charles Darnay after he was captured by the French commoners (Dicken 263). He didn’t have to forgive and accept the man from the family of sins, however, he did that for Lucie’s own good, and showed her the true love of a father. Lucie and her father shared a brilliant love. Their love for each other did not diminish through time and all the tragic events, because of the sheer power of emotion. The
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