Hong Kong Case Study

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Pro-democracy protestors in Hong Kong took to the streets earlier this week in protest of the financial hub’s future as either an enclave of freedom or another communist-controlled city. The protest was sparked by anger over China 's refusal to allow the open selection of candidates for Hong Kong 's leader in the city 's first democratic election scheduled for 2017. Contrary to the pre-specified agreement, a panel of Beijing supporters will pick two or three candidates to run. At stake in this contentious issue is not just the election but also the future of the former British colony as a semiautonomous city and the prospect of the pro-democracy movement spreading to the mainland. Hong Kong has a long tradition of peaceful-nonviolent protest, dating back to the outburst of grief and sorrow following the 1989 Tiananmen crackdown, and…show more content…
In theory, Hong Kong is expected to be moving toward full democracy, with the city’s chief executive to be elected by universal suffrage in 2017. Simultaneously, Hong Kong is presumed to be integrating and assimilating with the rest of…show more content…
Police in Hong Kong appear to have sacrificed decades of goodwill with the citizenry; their mandate having clearly changed from one of supporting freedom of expression to acting as a tool of an increasingly repressive and authoritarian government that seems committed to rule by law, rather than the rule of law. Objectively, Hong Kong appears to be ready for democratic rule. It is China that is not ready for a democratically governed Hong Kong it fears it cannot totally
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