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Happy Exam Week - "May The Odds Ever Be In Your Favor"

analytical Essay
1153 words
1153 words
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Midterms and Finals week have been coined “Hell Week” here at UW-Madison, and for very good reasons. Many midterms fall in the same week or day, and every teacher has different ideas on how to prepare their students for the exam. Another factor that stresses students out is that some final grades are completely dependent on three exam grades, so bombing one is not an option. What kinds of classes are best suited for a student to learn and thrive in? In the following, I will explore grading fairness, a student’s willingness to take risks with grades, and how students evaluate courses based on different factors. In the article titled “The Effects of Grading and Teaching Practices on Students’ Perceptions of Grading Fairness,” Michael Gordon and Charles Hay start off by saying that there is a lot of information about teachers’ perspective of grading, but very little information is given on how the students perceive grading. When students reported on their classes, it was found that they felt they were graded fair when teachers focused on prepping students for tests instead of “manipulating” the final grade (Gordon and Hay, Pg. 93). There are two different grade distribution rules. The first one is called meritocratic, and it means that grades are distributed based on academic achievement. High ability students tend to prefer this because it best portrays their knowledge. The second grade distribution rule is particularistic, which means that grades are distributed based on personal circumstances, such as the need to pass a class or problems in their lives that prevent them from getting their work done adequately and on time. Low ability students tend to prefer this method as it is much more forgivi... ... middle of paper ... ...mpared to a big lecture. In discussion, students should be ready to be called on since the group is smaller, but one would not expect that in a lecture hall where a student can be anonymous. To test these theories out, there would need to be two classrooms of students learning the same things, but each class would be structured differently. One class would be a lecture class, and the other class would have lectures, discussions, and daily work to keep them involved. Comparing grades and course evaluations at the end would determine which class seems to be better suited to the needs of students. In the end, the majority of students just want to perform well and understand the material. So, for the sake of final grades, students and teachers should work closer together when it comes to covering the material and find ways to be more involved in class.

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that there are two different grade distribution rules. the first one is called meritocratic.
  • Explains that they were taken from introduction to agribusiness at the university of arkansas in the spring of 2008.
  • Analyzes how the article “i liked your course because you” affects their final grade and evaluation.
  • Analyzes the data from the semester and halfway through the class for the students to complete.
  • Explains that midterms fall in the same week or day, and every teacher has different ideas on how to prepare their students for the exam. final grades are dependent on three exam grades, so bombing one is not an option.
  • Explains that michael gordon and charles hay start off by saying that there is a lot of information about teachers' perspective of grading, but very little information is given on how the students perceive it.
  • Explains that low ability students prefer the method of passing a class or problems in their lives that prevent them from getting work done adequately and on time.
  • Explains grade distribution is exam grade curving, which is used when a large portion of the class has done poorly on the exam, so professors will "fudge" to their preference or lower the cutoff.
  • Recommends that teachers pick books with study guides and prepare mock tests to test students' knowledge. additional class work can help students better understand the material.
  • Explains that economic theory states that individuals would rather pay for an outcome than bet for it.
  • Explains that students were given the chance to enter a lottery for quiz points, forcing them to decide if they wanted to make risky or safe bets.
  • Explains that more students chose the safe bet of taking an exam grade or taking a certain grade after the exam.
  • Explains the logic of choosing whether to receive a true exam grade or one that is based on test preparation and in-class work.
  • Explains that evaluations can be an indication of how well a class was taught. expectations for how the class will go are factors in an evaluation.
  • Explains that it is possible to possess both types of motivation. intrinsic motivation is when a student is looking to understand or master the subject.
  • Describes expectations, opinions, grades, and workload, broken down into hours of studying and difficulty.
  • Explains that grades, hours studied, and difficulty had a very small effect on course evaluations. the easiest way to get students involved is to assign homework and have discussions in class to make sure the material is understood.
  • Argues that students and teachers should work closer together when it comes to covering the material and find ways to be more involved.
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