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H.G. Wells' Time Machine and Its Relativity with the Victorian Era

Powerful Essays
H.G. Wells' Time Machine and Its Relativity with the Victorian Era Herbert George Wells was an English writer from the nineteenth century. He was born on September the 21st 1866 in Bromley, Kent. He first wrote a book when he was eleven; although this was not published it was a great achievement. He won a scholarship to the school of science, but he failed due to his other interests such as history, journalism, sociology and writing. His dad was a pro cricketer and a domestic servant. This may have had an influence on his work like in "The Time Machine" with the class divisions. His support in socialism influenced his work especially "The Time Machine" as he was a great supporter of Karl Marx. He married his cousin Isabel in 1891. But sadly he left her three years later. He was a member of the Fabians society and also the Pen society. He wrote many books, all in the science fiction genre such as "The First Man on the Moon" or "The Invisible Man". Some were turned into films such as "The War of the Worlds". He wrote in this Genre because he and the Victorians wanted to explore time and space but couldn't in reality so he wrote to relate to others at the time and help them imagine almost possibly a dream and what could happen in the end of that dream. He died on the 13th of August 1946. Queen Victoria reigned from 1819 to 1901. In the Victorian era people were divided into classes: upper and lower class. This era was a time of invention and of innovation because of the industrial revolution. The Victorian era was a quite advanced time as they had a great interest in exploration and they were very interested in inventions and what ... ... middle of paper ... ...e after "The Time Machine" was released the lower class got more opportunity to go to school and to learn to read and so it is only relevant to that period). He offers Communism as an alternative to the poor treatment of the lower class. This is a moral warning, so Wells is letting the Victorian upper class have the option to see it as a warning, but like the dinner guests, they also have the option to deny it. Wells lets this happen because he knows the upper class will not take it seriously and Wells does not want to challenge their status because after all it is just a book and if it is totally on the lower classes side the upper class would not buy it and he would not get his message across at all. Conclusion I can conclude that "The Time Machine" as a novel is very representative of the late Victorian era.