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Film Analysis: 'Hunt For The Wilderpeople'

analytical Essay
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1406 words
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*Hunt for the Wilderpeople* builds on Waititi 's drama/comedy combination and further cements his auteur status. *Wilderpeople* is about an orphan boy who moves from one foster family to another, generally being a delinquent. This causes him to earn the title of "a real bad egg". The majority of the film takes place as Ricky Baker is on the run through the vast forest. While structurally different than *Boy*, both films deal with coming-of-age, parents, and loneliness. Unlike *Boy*, *Wilderpeople* is divided up into ten chapters and an epilogue. Despite this, *Boy* is the more episodic film. Since *Wilderpeople* relies more on a causal narrative, it seems more like a standard Hollywood film at first. But Waititi finds a way to make it his own. …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Analyzes how waititi's "hunt for the wilderpeople" builds on his drama/comedy combination and cements his auteur status. both films deal with coming-of-age, parents, and loneliness.
  • Analyzes how a montage introduces the main character, ricky baker, and shows him loitering, kicking, burning things, etc.
  • Analyzes how the most memorable montage in the film isn't a'montag.' instead of cutting between these moments in time, the camera slowly turns 780 degrees and characters appear and disappear in parts of the forest as needed.
  • Analyzes how the montages combine seriousness and humor because the characters are exaggerated. ricky baker is a kid with issues, but he's also lazy.
  • Analyzes how nature is a character in *wilderpeople*. the film opens with helicopter shots of the mountains as overly dramatic choral music plays.
  • Analyzes how taika waititi's films mix drama and comedy in a way that doesn't diminish the other. he exaggerates his characters for comedic effect but makes sure that they never crossover into being too slapstick.

In scene 49, a 'montage ' shows the passage of time as Ricky Baker and Hector move through the woods as Paula, officers, and hunters chase after them. Except, instead of cutting between these moments in time, the camera slowly turns 780 degrees and characters appear and disappear in parts of the forest as needed. It 's a one-take montage. It 's a clever shot and it indicates Waititi is exploring other ways of presenting montages. It 's a very noticeable stylistic choice, but it doesn 't distract from what 's happening on screen. The montage itself is similar to previous ones in the film--passages of time are shown as humorous bits. The chase through the forest is a serious one--Hector is accused of molesting Ricky Baker and if Ricky Baker is caught, he would be sent to juvenile prison. And yet, since the film 's world includes incompetent police officers and hunters, the montage is …show more content…

In doing so, he has established a signature mark. Both his films mix drama and comedy in a way that does not diminish the other. He exaggerates his characters for comedic effect but makes sure that they never crossover into being too slapstick. His films are short, around ninety minutes, and use montages to move quickly through narrative. His films contain both causal and episodic narratives. All his scenes are relatively short so his characters have lots of opportunities for different interactions. And he uses nature to reveal how a character is feeling. The way he tells a story is unique and constantly fascinating. His style and brand of humor is instantly recognizable, whether you 're watching one of his features, shorts, or advertisements. He still has the opportunity for a long career ahead of him and as he moves into more mainstream Hollywood, it will be important to see how he changes. His films may not have won any Oscars, but they have received acclaim in New Zealand and abroad. His effectiveness as a director and writer is impressive and his talent undeniable. Because he has been able to carve out this auteur identity in such a crowded industry, his films are surely worthy of study in the future. At the very least, they 'll always be highly

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