Dances with Wolves: Changing from a Dignified Solider to a Sioux Warrior

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In the movie Dances with Wolves Lieutenant John Dunbar is a dynamic character; changing throughout the film from a dignified United States Army soldier, to a passionate Lakota Sioux member. On his journey, Dances With Wolves takes in many experiences many have only dreamt about. When he rides Cisco out onto the battlefield in a suicide attempt, he has no idea that he indeed will live and will never lead the same life again. John Dunbar changed in many ways reflected upon in the film, including: mindset, clothing, and his sense of identity; it is though these character traits that Dances With Wolves discovers that inside everyone is a frontier just waiting to be explored. When the Dunbar is first assigns himself to Fort Sedgwick, and sees that it is abandoned, he is still intent on staying, despite the guffaws of Timmons, a peasant who delivers him there. He starts cleaning up the camp and filling in the caves made by past residents. This shows that he places himself as a U.S. Army Soldier, and his loyalties lie with them. As the plot develops the tribe thinks that they can use Dunbar to tell them when and if more “White People” will be coming. Dunbar finds out that the Sioux people have little furnishing of buffalo left, and need more food to survive. Although Dunbar is withholding information about how many white people will be coming he still feels compelled to notify the Lakota Sioux where he saw a herd of buffalo stampeding by. He is feeling a transition in himself from soldier to Sioux, and this is even more prominent when Dunbar is given his own lodge among the tribe and is narrated to feel comfortable there. When Dunbar begins to learn Sioux and feels a sense of pride when the Sioux win against the Pawnee his evol... ... middle of paper ... ...ence later sees Dances with Wolves he is in full Sioux attire and will be mistaken for one by the U.S. Army. At the end of the film Ten Bears, the chief of the tribe, tells Dances with Wolves that Lieutenant John Dunbar no longer exists. As John Dunbar converts into Dances with Wolves he finds more than he thought he would on the American Frontier, he finds something more valuable then sights, something more valuable than money. John Dunbar finds himself. but, provided, and, although • Prepositional phrases: in addition to, in conclusion • Adverbs: also, however, nevertheless but, provided, and, although • Prepositional phrases: in addition to, in conclusion • Adverbs: also, however, nevertheless but, provided, and, although • Prepositional phrases: in addition to, in conclusion • Adverbs: also, however, nevertheless

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