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Blade Runner and New Brave World's Perspective's on Humanity

analytical Essay
1286 words
1286 words
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Blade Runner and New Brave World's Perspective's on Humanity Ridley Scott’s film “Blade Runner: Director’s Cut” and Aldous Huxley’s

novel “Brave New World” explore the concept of ‘In The Wild’ by

focusing on the natural world and its rhythms falling victim to

unbridled scientific development. They present a wedge that is

divorcing man from his relationship with nature, in an attempt to

define what it means to be ‘human’. Both texts depict chilling

dystopic futures where the materialistic scientific and economic ways

of thinking have been allowed to quash the humanistic religious and

philosophic ways of thinking, in the name of progress. In their texts,

these composers question this progress that they were already

witnessing in their own individual contexts, and thus warn future

contexts about straying from humanity’s natural origins.

Both composers criticize their individual contexts which, though fifty

years apart, deal with similar concerns for humanity and the natural

environment. Huxley’s context was the aftermath of WW1, where

depression and disillusionment saw European countries seeking

alternatives to democracy – Totalitarianism. These extreme dictatorial

forces promised stability, order and security but at the expense of

essential facets of humanity: freedom of choice, emotions,

intellectual stimulation and a qualitative relationship with nature.

Part of the 1920s melancholy was that the world witnessed their war

machines annihilate considerable portions of the human race. Also, in

1913,...

... middle of paper ...

...s science and technology.

the natural world and its rhythms being violated by tyrannous

scientific development

In, Huxley virulently attacks this brutal desire to curb our natural

state as humans. Also, after the invention of, caused by witnessing

devastating,, he voices his disapproval of man’s perpetual craving for

technological progress by satirizing the eternal question of “will

science be used for the good of mankind or to destroy it?”

voice his own disgust of his context and the deteriorating

relationship between man and nature.

The very symbol of life – the elemental force of the Sun – is rendered

powerless by the smog of this concrete jungle.

(Reinforcing the values of materialism and Reagonism is the

euphemistic retirement of the Replicants after which, they are

collected like garbage.)

In this essay, the author

  • Compares blade runner and new brave world's perspectives on humanity.
  • Analyzes how "brave new world" explores the concept of "in the wild" by focusing on the natural world and its rhythms falling victim to unbridled scientific development. both texts depict chilling dystopic futures where the materialistic scientific and economic ways
  • Analyzes how the composers question the progress they were already witnessing in their own individual contexts, and warn of straying from humanity's natural origins.
  • Analyzes how huxley's context was the aftermath of ww1, where depression and disillusionment saw european countries seeking alternatives to democracy — totalitarianism. these dictatorial forces promised stability, order and security but at the expense of essential facets of humanity.
  • Analyzes how huxley's 'brave new world' was born from the 1920s melancholy of war machines annihilating considerable portions of the human race.
  • Analyzes the irony of progression that is, in fact, backward in its effects on humanity and its natural rythms. in scott's 1980s context, global corporations were rapidly expanding, and were increasingly threatening individual autonomy.
  • Analyzes how "blade runner" predicted 1980s america's future as a society overrun by commercialism, globalization and consumerism where nature was being rapidly exhausted to allow for man’s unbridled thirst for technological development.
  • Analyzes how the composers' dramatic use of dystopic settings illustrate humanity's dislocation from traditional religious and philosophic ways of thinking.
  • Analyzes how the post-apocalyptic tone has inverted l.a. into a "fallen city of angels". contrasting this with the dulcet soundtrack emphasizes the dissonant nature of this environment.
  • Analyzes how the opening chapter of "brave new world" introduces the paradox that human life is scientifically engineered in "fertilizing rooms" and portrays the world state as a society that has denied its people what defines their very existence.
  • Analyzes how huxley and scott's settings are diametrically opposed, but both overtly depict humanity straying from its natural origins and becoming metaphorically lost in the wilderness of science and materialism.
  • Analyzes how the technocratic world state of "brave new world" is populated by scientifically engineered beings – a complete subversion of the natural rhythms of human life cycle.
  • Analyzes how the world state has "applied mass-production to biology" — people are engineered by the 1000s, and technology is integrally involved. the existence of surrogates symbolizes the uncultivated nature of the natural order.
  • Analyzes how john the savage rejects the "brave new world" by rejecting the naturalness of god, poetry, freedom and sin.
  • Analyzes how "brave new world" portrays a world in which technology is fast growing as the new god.
  • Analyzes how tyrell capitalizes/corporatizes the role of god by technologically manufacturing life.
  • Compares the compassionate and emotional characterization of the science-fiction replicants, as demonstrated by the personal pronoun in "i want more."
  • Analyzes how "blade runner" examines the quality of humanity through mechanical replicants, while "brave new world" explores human qualities through humans who have had them stripped away.
  • Analyzes how "blade runner" and "brave new world" warn of the detrimental human desire to control what god intended to flourish uninhibited — humanity and its relationship with the natural world.
  • Analyzes how these texts integrate criticism with each composer’s moral, values and ethics to create a new text with old ideas.
  • Compares roy batty's spiritual depth with the religious symbolism of the dove, and concludes that genuine, natural emotions are of utmost importance to humanity.
  • Analyzes how huxley and scott prophesize for our world and challenge whether progress is actually beneficial for humanity.
  • Analyzes how huxley virulently attacks the brutal desire to curb our natural state as humans. he voices his disapproval of man’s perpetual craving for technological progress by satirizing the eternal question of “will science be used for the good of mankind or to destroy it?”
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