Backed into a corner

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innocent people. Eyewitness had told them that Montgomery had jumped and fired directly at Attacks killing him. Was there something they had missed that would make them consider as Chief Hale had stated “err on the side of mercy”? However, John Adams knew that using just one brilliant English lawyer was not enough, so he again cited another admired judge and lawyer, Chancellor John Fortescue. Fortescue was born in 1394 and served as a judge during the time of King Henry VI’s rule in England. Here again, Adams used the influence of another Englishman to help persuade the jurors. From the words of Fortescue, Adams said to the court, “ it is better that the guilty escape punishment than the innocent suffer”. The fate of these men lay in the hands of John Adams and he knew he had to impress abound the judge and jury the fact that they were firing in self-defense and not in malice or hatred. As these men set listing to Adams speak to the crowd, they must have pondered the events of that night in their minds. As the trial continued, Adams began to educate the jury not on the events that had taken place, but the laws as written within English law. He first stated that the incident, which had occurred, was not murder, but homicide. According to Adams just because a man had killed another man, it is not considered a crime. Here the doubt of whether murder has occurred in this particular case was placed in the minds of the jury. Adams was clever and knew the law as he explained in great detail the breakdown of homicide to the court. The breakdown was simple there were three distinct types of homicide that Adams made clear to the jury. 1) justifiable, 2) excusable and 3) felonious which was subdivided into two parts a) m...

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... as it unfolded in attempt to help the jury and judge understand the timeline as it happened. He asked the jury if they believed the witness that had sworn to be truthful that the soldiers were under duress from the start. From the start of the incident from eye-witness testimony 12 men in what appeared to many was sailor outfits showed up with clubs in their hands. They approached the soldiers in a uproar over what had happened. As the bells rang the people assembled and another fifty or so gathered according to testimony given the day prior. Adams stated to the jury, what was to be expected with a crowd of this size against a group of eight soldiers. They were yelling and screaming, throwing objects and the soldiers and daring them to fire at them as well as screaming for those in the crowd to kill the soldiers. Adams, however did call into testimony the
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