Use of Logos, Ethos, and Pathos in the Article, Is Santa Claus a Conspiracy?

Use of Logos, Ethos, and Pathos in the Article, Is Santa Claus a Conspiracy?

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Jay Mocks article “Is Santa Clause a Conspiracy?” first appeared on The River Journal website on December 11th, 2009. Mock, an online blogger who has the mindset that there are conspiracies behind many things that go on in the world, seeks to encourage readers to discover whether there is a conspiracy behind Santa Claus. If so, whether or not it is maintained by the lies of parents, and whether or not their intentions are good because they support good, and even so would that still qualify as a bad thing? “We sometimes knowingly lie or overlook a lie if the reason is to support ‘good’” (Mock p4). The legend of Santa Claus can be the lure to which mankind falls into a ploy of conspiracy that may fortify a manipulative mindset and devious conduct in people. This article is a good example of how conspiracy theorist can appeal to readers through persuasion by the use of three kinds of proofs, reasoning (logos), credibility (ethos), and emotion (pathos). Although this article is a great attention grabber, it lacks the ability to impose the authors’ thoughts and feelings upon its readers.
Several rhetorical concepts are used to approach the readers of this article, these being proofs known as reasoning (logos), credibility (ethos), and emotion (pathos). Conspiracy theorists, such as Mock, often use logic or reason to attract readers. They understand that conspiracies are seen as lies and paranoia, so to build their audience they appeal to their logical side. In today’s society logic is everything, and being able to prove something is what is important. Making a reference to a factual document or book is always a source of proof. The reference towards a dictionary is used because it is something we use every day, something that is impo...


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...could then cause anger and resentment towards the parents. Fear is also invoked in this article; the fear of the child losing that little patch of innocence.
The legend of Santa Claus can be the lure to which mankind falls into a ploy of conspiracy that may fortify a manipulative mindset and devious conduct in people. It is up to the reader to ultimately decide how they feel about this article. This article analyses one conspiracy, but what about other conspiracies that are similar. Taking Mocks article under consideration and everything he talks about can open up a new perspective. This editorial is a good example of how conspiracy theorist can charm to readers through persuasion. When reading similar pieces readers should be aware of how the author lures them in.



Work Cited
Mock, Jay. “Is Santa Clause a Conspiracy?.” River Journal. 12 Nov.2009 Web.

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