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    PRIME SUSPECTS

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    When a murder crime is investigated the people who they first suspect and look at are the people closest to the victim. More often than not the perpetrator will be someone known to the victim or close to them. When the body of Charles Preller was found the evidence was leading them to believe that the perpetrator of the crime was a society called the black hand. The experience made the lead investigator reason that the evidence did not fit the facts and led him to the question the people close to

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    The Usual Suspects

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    Usual Suspects When it was released in 1995, The Usual Suspects was hailed as original, inventive, and, most of all, unpredictable. Having now seen this movie well over a dozen times, I can say that its impact is just as powerful today as it was the first time I saw it. In what I consider to be the best movie-making year of all-time, The Usual Suspects nonetheless distinguishes itself from everything else, offering a fresh take on the mystery and suspense genre. As The Usual Suspects opens

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    Throughout the year’s photo line up’s of suspects have rightfully convicted many criminals, but have you ever stopped to think that some of the witnesses may misconceive who the perpetrators actually are. I have heard of a few criminal investigations where the wrong person was incarcerated for many years because of the witness’s identification of the “suspects” photo in a line up. When I saw this topic in the FBI’s archived stories I knew I had to read it. I know that the percentage of rightfully

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    The Usual Suspects

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    The Usual Suspects is a film centered around a man named Roger “Verbal” Kint. In the movie, Verbal tells his story to U. S. Customs Officer Dave Kujan (Singer, 1995). The story is portrayed in flashbacks, and thus, the gruesome tale of five men and their journey of destruction which leads to all but one of their deaths unfolds in a police station office. The Usual Suspects has scenes, scenarios, and suspects that all can represent or dispute psychological principles. To begin, a terrible explosion

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    he Usual Suspects by Christopher McQuarrie The Usual Suspects (Bryan Singer, 1995) was written by Christopher McQuarrie and shot on a low budget $6 million (estimated) for such a successful film grossing over $51 million worldwide. The storyline is a crime mystery thriller the genre has a set of conventions, they create a high level of anticipation, uncertainty, mystery and nerve-wracking tension. They also help the audience understand the film more easily and know what to expect from

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    house in a poor section of Sana'a's downtown, and a firefight ensued. The suspect jumped into a taxi, and as authorities tried to stop the vehicle, the man pulled out a grenade and was apparently trying to throw it when it exploded in his hand, sources said. A police statement identified the suspect as Sameer Mohammed al-Hada, a 25-year-old Yemen native. He was one of the most important people on a list of wanted al Qaeda suspects that the United States had given to Yemeni officials, sources said. Al-Hada

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    The Effect of Editing and Sound Features on Audience Response in The Usual Suspects 'The Usual Suspects' was directed by Brian Singer and released in 1995. Singer has directed several films including 'X-Men' and (earlier) 'Public Access''. Although Public Access was his first film it did not receive significant recognition, which is why the explosive success of The Usual |Suspects established him as something of a maverick. This film is predominantly a crime thriller which examines the

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    Terrorist Suspects

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    vacation with his family in Tunisia, and was returning to Canada. Arar was detained because his name had been placed on the United States Watch List of terrorist suspects. He was held for the next thirteen days, as American officials questioned him about possible links to another suspected terrorist. Arar said that he barely knew the suspect, although he had worked with the man's brother. Arar, who was not formally charged, was placed in handcuffs and leg irons by plainclothes officials and transferred

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    The Miranda Warning

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    Without the law, many suspects may be treated unfairly. It is a necessary safeguard. Miranda is a ruling which says that the accused have the right to remain silent and prosecutors may not use statements made by them while in police custody, unless the police advice them of their rights. In other words, a police officer must inform a suspect of this fundamental right, under the Fifth Amendment, at the time of their arrest and or interrogation. Miranda protect ignorant suspects from incriminating themselves

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    Investigating a home burglary

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    someone, a witness who sees the suspect enter the residence, report it. This will take us to the second objective much more quickly. A burglary in progress is dispatched immediately with a minimum of two officers, while a burglary report is dispatched within thirty minutes with a one officer response (Columbus Police 2007). The police will be dispatched to a burglary in progress quicker and with a larger response. The second objective is locating and identifying suspects. If it was a burglary in progress

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    criminal justice

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    when does officer feels his/her life is grave danger and to escape has to use deadly force? What circumstances will justify the use of deadly force? Deadly Force depends on the officer discretion, when the officer makes the decision to investigate suspects. Also it depends on the how strongly the officers follow the Code of Ethics. In the Code of Ethics in paragraph 3 it reads “I will enforce the law courteously and appropriately without fear or favor, malice or ill will , never employing force or

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    evidence. This allows you to take a piece of hair, a spot of blood, or skin tissue and make a positive identification on a suspect. Since it's first use by the FBI in December 1988 it has grown to become a major factor in criminal investigation. This new key gives them help when the crime scene lacks evidence. DNA evidence also allows detectives to narrow down suspects and keep innocent people from being prosecuted. In 1990 the FBI began development of a national DNA identification index

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    brutality across the United States. Thousands of individual complaints about police abuse are reported each year and local authorities pay out millions of dollars to victims in damages after lawsuits. Police officers have beaten and shot unresisting suspects; they have misused batons, chemical sprays, and electro-shock weapons; they have injured or killed people by placing them in dangerous restraint holds. This is the first paragraph of an unprecedented and historic report, USA: Rights for All, issued

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    their citizens will face the death penalty. Reporters asked Ashcroft whether he was willing to give a guarantee that terrorist suspects who were extradited to the U.S. would not face capital punishment, but he concluded that it is a case-by-case decision. The article further states that European countries have abolished the death penalty and will not extradite suspects who face the death penalty in another country (Johnson 1). I believe it is every country’s right to vote and draft a law deciding

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    The novel Witness for the Defense: The Accused, the Eyewitness, and the Expert Who Puts Memory on Trial goes into great detail about the encounters an expert witness, on memory especially, might come across by telling true stories from Dr. Elizabeth Loftus’s experiences with the help of Katherine Ketcham. It also provides information about Loftus’s work and research on memory and its limitations and malleability (Loftus & Ketcham, 1991). Applying research on memory to this novel allows one to better

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    are many incidents where it’s not Hamlet’s poor attitude that gets him in trouble, but his great ambition to uncover the truth. Once Hamlet discovers that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are spying on him, he never lets them out of his sight. Hamlet suspects that his mother, Gertrude, was an accomplice for the murder of his father. Polonius was slain by Hamlet who had mistaken him for Claudius. His pretense of madness drove Ophelia to her death. All of these incidents show that its Hamlet’s great ambition

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    Crime and the Media

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    races of the suspects portrayed in the episodes of COPS were African Americans (Langley, 2005). The predominant genders of the suspects were male. However, the May 5, 2005, episode of COPS featured an exclusive on COPS: Bad Girls (Langley, 2005). Combining the special episode with the four and a half hours of regular viewing of COPS the numbers still reflect the predominance of suspects featured are African American males (Langley, 2005). In two cases out of the nineteen viewed, the suspects were Caucasian

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    fence, robbed him of his wallet and patent leather shoes, continued to beat him and left him to die for over 18 hours. Chasity Vera Pasley (20) and Krista Lean Price (18), the suspect’s girlfriends, hid the bloody shoes of Henderson and provided the suspects with alibis. Shepard’s shoes, coat and credit card were found in McKinney’s pick-up truck; his wallet was found in McKinney’s home. A .357 Magnum was also found in McKinney’s home (Matthew Shepard, 2000 [on-line]). On April 5, 1999, 22 year old,

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    them. Today’s inmates live better off than most American citizens who are often working two jobs just to meet paying their taxes. A criminal can literally get away with murder because of a technicality, police can barely interrogate suspects without the suspects’ lawyers stating some legal issues that prevent further investigations. It almost seems that the very people who do not respect the law are above it. A criminal is obviously an individual who commits a crime, but what is crime? A crime

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    County Jail Someone, suspected of a crime, is arrested by police. Later on, the suspect goes to court to face their charges. A classic episode of Law & Order. But, where do these suspects go in between the two events. They are held in their local jail of course. While people are familiar with the arrest and courtroom scenes from TV, many are unfamiliar with the jail scene, which becomes home to the suspects who cannot make bail until a court rules a verdict for their case. So, let’s expand

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