Free Professor Moriarty Essays and Papers

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    Comparing Villains in The Speckled Band, The Final Problem, and The Cardboard Box I have chosen to look at three villains from three different stories. These are Dr Roylott from ‘The Speckled Band’, Professor Moriarty from ‘The Final Problem’ and Jim Browner from ‘The Cardboard Box’. Each of these villains has his own distinctive qualities. One is a victim but also a villain, one is just plain horrible, and one is the most cunning head of crime in the world. They are all diverse in the way

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    Moriarty provokes Holmes, saying “Rest assured, if you attempt to bring destruction down upon me, I shall do the same to you.” (Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows). Game theory, also known as “The theory of games of strategy,” has many applications: economic, mathematic, political, and psychological. Game theory can also be implicated when discussing the relationships between criminals and detectives. Sherlock Holmes, a character created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is famous for his logical deductive

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    Holmes’ close friend, Dr. John H. Watson. The viewers are also introduced to Holmes’ nemesis Professor James Moriarty. The film displays a background for the creation of Sherlock Holmes and how Holmes and Watson “supposedly” met during their early years. If Young Sherlock Holmes creates background information for those who are interested in Sherlock Holmes and wonder how Holmes, Watson and Professor Moriarty met as well as how they were created, then maybe the film is a great way to introduce these

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    After the debriefing over Moriarty 's malevolent endeavors Watson still agreed to join Holmes on his trip. He did not hesitate joining his companion in his flee even after learning about the evil intentions of Moriarty. Watson’s loyalty is evident in the “Adventures of A Dying Detective”, as Holmes insults Watson’s medical competence. Watson endures the depreciative comment

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    hero. It’s no surprise that the Warner Bros studio has decided to create a sequel for franchise, with Guy Ritchie remaining on directing duties, and arch nemesis Professor Moriarty taking center stage as the film’s villain. The film starts out in London in 1891, Sherlock goes on a wild goose chase with his arch nemesis Professor James Moriarty (Jared Harris). Holmes’ investigation into Moriarty’s plot becomes dangerous as it leads him and Watson out of London to France, Germany and finally Switzerland

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    Author's Introduction I have always been strongly drawn to the Sherlock Holmes stories and books, and while reading and writing about Sherlock Holmes I experience strange feelings of familiarity and satisfaction. I have been told I look like Sir Arthur, and that my wife resembles Lady Doyle. Does reincarnation really happen? Is it possible? Make of this whatever you will. Crime Mystery Detective Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes is the world's best-known crime mystery detective. More of his books

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    Sherlock Holmes

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    Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes is a famous fictional detective with his own series of books written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle between the late 1800’s and early 1900’s otherwise known as the Victorian era in England. The stories were set in London on Baker Street. The people of Victorian England loved Sherlock Holmes because he always got his man, and the police in their time could not get anyone. Another reason the English people from the Victorian era loved Sherlock Holmes is the way

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    Sherlock Holmes has been featured in several stories by his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Traditionally, he has been highly regarded for his intellect. Nonetheless, a multifold of readers question if Holmes has emotions. Holmes' thoughts are a mystery. Readers only know the thoughts of his friend Dr. John Watson, who narrates the stories Holmes is in. I have reason to believe that Holmes has displayed through his actions, including through what he says, that he indeed has emotions. At the same

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    Sherlock Holmes Analysis

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    The original stories about Sherlock Holmes were written by Arthur Conan Doyle in late 19th and early 20th century London, the same setting he used in the stories (Magher). These stories recount the cases, and corresponding adventures, that Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson partake in (Doyle, Sherlock Holmes: The Major Stories). The character of Sherlock Holmes is seen by many as a paragon of logic and justice in the midst of a constantly advancing Victorian society—one that is progressive for the

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    An examination of how Sherlock Holmes' abilities and techniques, allied to his personal characteristics, enable him to solve crimes There are many reasons to explain why Sherlock Holmes is one of the world's most famous fictional detectives. However, the main reason for this is that not only are the stories complex, but the actual character of Sherlock Holmes has extreme depth, with some subtle elements of his character only becoming apparent when he is in certain situations. This is why

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    House, M.D.

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    Since the turn of the twenty-first century, many societal changes have taken place. Old fashion tendencies have become irrelevant and societal boundaries are nonexistent. Cultural advancements such as women’s rights, gay marriage, abortion, and other controversial issues are now accepted among most members of society. As old-fashion boundaries are falling from beneath our feet in today’s progressing society, man struggles with determining his identity as an individual and as a group. The television

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    What’s Hidden Between the Lines? In The Hound of Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the reader can tell a lot about the characters and their relationships just through the dialogue alone. Sherlock Holmes is dominant, or the alpha, and plays the master role when it comes to working with his apprentice, John Watson. Watson plays the obedient apprentice who wants to make his master proud. The dialogue allows the readers to see what the author did not blatantly state. Through solely analyzing

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    One of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s greatest writings is “A Scandal in Bohemia.” Doyle’s’ writings could be categorized as fiction as well as realism. Doyle’s novels drew a crowd from the wealthy, the workers and the women in the Victorian England, each for different reasons. Doyle had in the Victorian era, and still has today, the ability to appeal to audiences all over the world. The Victorians were phenomenally energetic, explorers and missionaries, respectable and conventional, but unfortunately

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    The fascinating character of Sherlock Holmes was born when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had A Study in Scarlet published in 1887, which was followed shortly after by The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (Doyle; “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Published”). The original stories are from the point of a view of a man named John Watson, a former British Army Doctor, who recounts his becoming of the unlikely partner of Sherlock Holmes and the cases they pursued (Doyle). The extraordinary abilities Holmes shows

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    Classic works serve as timeless pieces for the enthusiast reader. However, in order for these works to have the same impact it is important that the audiences connect with the story at hand. A great number of differences are evident between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s original short story “A Scandal in Bohemia,” and A Scandal in Belgravia, written by Stephen Moffat, from BBC’s Sherlock. It is due to these differences that the episode serves as an effective representation of Doyle’s work for

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    Doyle takes a risk by changing the point of view from memory to letters, but it was a risk well taken. By by adapting the point of view, Doyle can limit the amount of information the reader receives and makes it much easier to place in red herrings. The reader could be easily mislead and deceived through these letters, because some of the information given can lead to incorrect suspicions towards certain characters. Doyle makes the reader work hard by limiting the amount of information we receive

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    Validating Prompt Statements Essay “The Dying Detective” was dramatized by Michael and Mollie Hardwick. The short story became a theatre play and had an interesting take of Sherlock Holmes’s way to solve a mystery. One morning, Watson came to visit Sherlock since he worried for his dear friend after hearing he had fallen ill. He spoke of an illness from a type of plant- Watson had never been cognizant or aware of this illness. However, Sherlock had feigned his illness. He objected to any medical

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    “The single biggest mistake writers make while creating characters, is they think of the hero and all other characters as separate individuals.”-John Truby: Anatomy of Story. How true, especially when it comes to the characters of the Sherlock. Without Watson, most would not know the true character of Holmes and vice versa. With that being said, the characters would be weakly developed, and pointless. Luckily this show, does not depict those said bad habits’. Sherlock: A study in pink embodies the

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    Sherlock Holmes is a pioneer for establishing modern scientific methods for the criminal justice system. . His science of deduction method has motivated forensic investigation and the development of forensic evidence labs for the criminal justice system. Forensic evidence is the application of science to the examination of physical evidence related to the investigation of a crime scene and a crime or criminal activity. During the 19th century, the British criminal justice system lacked a court of

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    Holmes presents us with a world view that is imminently sane, secure and predictable - the very antithesis of what Doyle found in his own life and what we often find in ours. Sherlock Holmes Coursework (rough draft) Q. What writing techniques that Sherlock Holmes utilized made his stories so popular in the 1890s What I can tell you about his style is that Conan Doyle writes in a very baroque style, that I had some difficulty following, but when analyzed I can tell you everything you

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