Free Poor Law Amendment Act 1834 Essays and Papers

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Free Poor Law Amendment Act 1834 Essays and Papers

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    The Aims and Principles of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act In the decades prior to the national reform of the Poor Law in 1834, the characterisations of the administration were of variety rather than uniformity. The social and economic changes at this time produced many problems for those that were responsible for the social welfare. Many areas throughout the country though found solutions to this problem within the legal frame-work of the Elizabethan Poor Law of 1597-1601. In the initial

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    Gressenhall was Made an Uninviting Place Source Based In this essay my objective is to explain how Gressenhall Workhouse, situated in Norfolk, was made an uninviting place subsequent to 1834, and also how it was successful in doing this. The Gressenhall workhouse was severely affected by the 1834 poor law amendment act, as previously the workhouse was relatively relaxed but then it had to adapt to the new government requirements, saying that the workhouses were to be as grim as possible. So in order

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    The Poor Law Amendment Act and Tackling Poverty The Poor Law of 1601 was the first to codify the idea of the state to provide for the welfare of its citizens. It distinguished between the 'deserving' and the 'undeserving' poor; relief was local and community controlled.1 The 1834 Poor Law Act Amendment Act was an amendment to the Act for the relief of The English Poor Law of 1601. The Speenhamland System The Speenhamland System first saw light of day in 1795. It was introduced by the

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    John Snow John Snow born on the 15th March 1813 – 16th June 1858 grew up in the poorest region of York and subsequently specialised his life establishing the link between the cholera infection he had first encountered in 1831 in Newcastle and water as its vector. Snow’s most famous attribute was his research relating to the cholera outbreak in the London Epidemic of 1854. ‘On proceeding to the spot, I found that nearly all the deaths had taken place within a short distance of the [Broad Street] pump

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    Bentham's philosophical principles extended into the realm of government. These principles have been associated with several reform acts entered into English law such as the Factory Act of 1833, the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834, the Prison Act of 1835, the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835, the Committee on Education in 1839,the Lunacy Act of 1845, and the Public Health Act of 1845. In terms of their effect on Victorian era reform Bentham's two most influential works appear to be An Introduction to

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    1948 successive governments introduced a series of Welfare `Amendments' which undoubtedly addressed the problem of poverty. This can be proved by analysing 4 significant periods between these times. First of all there was the Poor Law Amendment Act which was introduced by the Whig government. This was designed to investigate in which poor relief was being granted. The later 19th century saw the introduction of various Public Health Acts by the Conservative government. These had a great impact on

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    about the system, whether for or against, and this caused a lot of controversy. Firstly source F " The rights of the Poor to Liberty and life" written by Richard Oastler in 1836. Richard Oastler was a Yorkshire writer and a member of the anti- poor Law campaign. This source is against the workhouse system. The evidence for this is in the first sentence stating "hellish poor law bastilles." This word "Bastilles" is French for prisons. This shows that the writer thinks the paupers were kept in

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    In 1959, the Government passed the Mental Health Act, the Act aimed to reduce the reliance on long stay institutions, sparking the beginning of de-institutionalisation and community care (Blakemore & Warwick-Booth, 2013). Bauduin (2001) defines de-institutionalisation as the “reform process of mental health

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    begins as you are led to do various different chores throughout the day.  This is the life in a workhouse. Workhouses “were places where poor homeless people worked and in return they were fed and housed.  In 1834 The Poor Law Amendment Act was introduced which wanted to make the workhouse more of a deterrent to idleness as it was believed that people were poor because they were idle and needed to be punished.  So people in workhouses were deliberately treated harshly and the workhouses were more

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    in the mid 1800’s had a huge gulf between the rich and the poor, This was because before 1834, the cost of looking after the poor was growing more expensive every year. This cost was paid by the middle and upper classes in each town through their local taxes. There was a real suspicion amongst the middle class and upper classes that they were paying the poor to be lazy and avoid work. This made a divide between the rich and the poor, this was because the middle and upper class people did not

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