Free Narrow Road Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    narrator encounters a dead deer on the edge of the road. He knows that the safe and proper course of action is to push the deer into the canyon, but when he finds that the doe was near giving birth before she died, he hesitates to kill the unborn fawn. Stafford's central idea in the poem revolves around the decision the narrator makes to sacrifice the deer in order to clear the road of obstacles, so that others who drive on the dark, narrow road won't have to swerve. The image of the deer evokes

    • 725 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    days and nights in the desert," are capable of attaining the reward of Heaven, while the weak millions, "who are weak but still love Thee... must exist for the sake of the strong." The Inquisitor states that the reason the weak cannot take the narrow road to Heaven is that they are afraid of freedom, that "they can never be free." Trent Reznor of the musical group Nine Inch Nails summarized the Inquisitor's view of humanity in "Happiness In Slavery." In the second verse, Reznor sings, "Slave screams

    • 1007 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    There it lay. A dead doe in middle of the road. The previous driver obviously had not thought twice after hitting the deer and had no sincerity towards nature nor the decency to at least move the carcass off the narrow road. The deer lay in the road, unburied, uncared for, unmourned, and untended. Ironically, if the carcass had remained on the road, it might have meant the taking of the life of another driver as Stafford stated in line 4: "that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead". The

    • 1187 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Japanese literature

    • 1040 Words
    • 3 Pages

    does this in order to see new places, visit sites of earlier poets, and to spread his views. For Basho traveling is a way of life, and because he travels alone one could say that Basho is very much an independent individual. Throughout Basho’s Narrow Road it seems as if there is a lack of people he encounters on such a long journey. The reader does not know if this is because Basho chooses to leave out the people he meets from his story or because he truly does not encounter many. In any way, the

    • 1040 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan focuses on the life of Dorrigo Evans, an Australian prisoner of war in a Japanese internment camp during World War II. Like many other novels published after World War II, it firmly censures war. Flanagan does not spare the reader any description of the terrible circumstances of war. Unlike several other anti-war novels, however, he depicts the maladies of being a prisoner of war along with the circumstances of combat and post-war impacts. Flanagan

    • 1051 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Burma. In “The Narrow Road to the Deep North,” Richard Flanagan depicts the horrendous conditions surrounding the building of what came to be known as the Burma Death Railway. In order to allow the Japanese Imperial Army to transport goods to Burma at a much quicker rate, prisoners faced immense hardships such as forced labour, malnutrition, and serious health concerns that included endless PTSD trauma, and appalling sanitary conditions . Richard Flanagan’s novel “The Narrow Road to the Deep North”

    • 1823 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan is a fictional novel that is closely based on recorded history. It is a depiction of the brutality that Australian soldiers endured in a Japanese prisoner of war camp in Siam, Thailand during World War II. At this time Japan was in dire need to find a more efficient route to use to resupply its army fighting in Thailand. Using water routes in the Pacific Ocean was too risky, putting supplies in danger of being destroyed by the enemy. The emperor

    • 1617 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Flanagan, through the book the Narrow Road to the Deep North, creates a representation of Prisoner of War experiences in World War II. Through clever manipulation of characters, textual and linguistic features, he has effectively portrayed war experiences as something more complex than violence; but one full of belonging, isolation and love. Using characterisation and aesthetic features, Flanagan has created a successful representation of the theme isolation in the book by portraying isolation in

    • 531 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Narrow Road of the Interior written by Matsuo Basho “Until the seventeenth century, Japanese Literature was privileged property. …The diffusion of literacy …(and) the printed word… created for the first time in Japan the conditions necessary for that peculiarly modern phenomenon, celebrity” (Robert Lyons Danly, editor of The Narrow Road of the Interior written by Matsuo Basho; found in the Norton Anthology of World Literature, Second Edition, Volume D). Celebrity is a loose term at times;

    • 1218 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Smith Quotes

    • 660 Words
    • 2 Pages

    interest to manage, renders such assemblies necessary. An incorporation not only renders them necessary, but makes the act of the majority binding upon the whole. The Wealth of Nations, , Book I, Chapter X, p130 To widen the market and to narrow the competition is always the interest of the dealers... The proposal of any new law or regulation of commerce which comes from this order, ought always to be listened to with great precaution, and ought never to be adopted, till after having been

    • 660 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    I Don't Think This Feels Right

    • 567 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    I can’t walk without my heel springing out.” Mom says, “It says they are a ten and a half.” “Well they sure don’t feel like it.” “Ok, try these.” She hands me a painfully narrow pair of black and white Pumas. I look at them, then at my mother, then back at the pair of shoes. I can almost feel the agonizing squeeze of the narrow, leather/cloth-laden shoes just by looking at them. I suck in a breath and begin the shoe donning process. I couldn’t get them on. No matter which way I tugged or pulled,

    • 567 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stakeholder identification and Salience Theory article most of all. Too often our definition of stakeholder is either too broad or narrow to fit in our analysis for change. The broad definition of stake or stakeholders limits an analysts scope to the individual or group who can and are affected by the achievement of an organization (Mitchell, Agle, Wood, 1997). However, on the narrow side of the definition, a stakeholder analyst can “pigeon hole” their scope to those who are voluntary, those who have invested

    • 755 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    A Trip to the Store

    • 941 Words
    • 2 Pages

    pull out of the driveway and turn left on Hazelwood Road. He would go past the neighbors on whose land he bowhunted every fall, down the hill, between the swamps and up the next hill to the highway. There he would right onto County Road 20 and cruise down the narrow road that wound past the State Park and the Country Club, probably glance at the lake to see how many ice houses were on the lake and then continue to the intersection of County Road 21. There he would turn left and continue on his way

    • 941 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    the inability to eliminate or narrow traffic lanes. Shared lane pavement has been used in cities like Paris (FR), Gainesville (FL), Cambridge (MA), and many more cities; hence, “cyclists shift their positions by a few inches” away from any motor vehicles (Gajda, el at, 2004). In Cambridge (Community Development Program, n.a.), shared lane pavement has received similar results to San Francisco. Therefore, the option could be considered if the traffic lanes are too narrow, the inability to eliminate

    • 667 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Room 101

    • 664 Words
    • 2 Pages

    I am here today to convince you that the outrageously rude, belligerent, and hazardous road hogs also known as ‘cyclists in central London’ should be put into Room 101. Cyclists are impertinent, self centred people who feel that whatever they do is correct. They ride around on their annoying two wheeled children’s toys, which have no protection, and they render themselves invisible by refusing to wear reflective clothing. The “Red light riders” are a mysterious bunch of clowns who travel day and

    • 664 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Language, Imagery, and Diction in Emily Dickinson's Because I could not stop for Death, A narrow Fellow in the Grass, and I felt a Funeral in my Brain All good poets use the basic literary techniques of figurative language, imagery, and diction in their poems.  However, only great poets use these techniques to transmit an experience to the reader; Emily Dickinson was one these poets.  She used these techniques to bring the reader a new perception of life, and to widen and sharpen the readers’

    • 955 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Emily Dickinson's Poetry

    • 1016 Words
    • 3 Pages

    oars divide the ocean....." Dickinson's attitude to passing moments is quite complex, as she does not interpret them simply as a "passing moment" but an extraordinary descriptive event. Another example of a passing moment would be in "A narrow fellow in the grass" In this poem Dickinson's keen observation of passing moments is clearly observed. She notices every movement of the snake even though his movements are very sudden and fast. Initially the snake is characterized as transient

    • 1016 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    poems. Lawrence writes his poem, Snake, in a free verse style, whereas Dickinson writes her untitled poem as she did many of her poems, in iambic tetrameter and trimeter. The meter of her poem shifts in every other line from four meters to three. “A narrow fellow in the grass, Occasionally rides;”, exhibits this form of rhythm. Lawrence's free verse style is also a characteristic of many of his works. His poem contains no conventional style of meter, only alternating long and short lines which can also

    • 831 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    glistening in the sun the two white race stripes cutting down the lanes on sand covered road, the heat of the California desert blaring off the asphalt the humid wind flowing through the cab of the car as the gas pedal is pushed to the floor the roar of the 350 tearing through the wind, the dark clouds pouring over the mountains in the distance as the car reaches 120 mph, as it reaches a curve in the middle of the road, without slowing the car barrels around the slow grade turn with ease. The seats of

    • 798 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    is addressed in William Stafford’s “Traveling Through the Dark,” in which the speaker nearly strikes a dead doe on the windy Wilson River Road. Instead of driving by the doe like most indifferent travelers, he stops to remove it. Although the speaker’s actions may appear inhumane, the speaker makes the ethical choice by pushing the dead pregnant doe off the road into the canyon because he saves the fawn from unspeakable suffering, the conditions were not conducive for him to save the fawn, and by

    • 734 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays