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    Mister Rogers' Positive Influence on Children

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    Mister Rogers' Positive Influence on Children It's a beautiful day in this neighborhood, A beautiful day for a neighbor Would you be mine? Could you be mine? I’ve always wanted to have a neighbor just like you. I’ve always wanted to live in a neighborhood with you. The comforting words of this familiar childhood jingle bring memories flooding back and invite us to join the loving and patient man who once taught us that everyone is special and unique. Over several decades, strong

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    Positive Effects of Television Upon Children

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    Positive Effects of Television Upon Children Without a doubt, television is the central and principal form of communication in many people’s lives. This form is most often exposed to a child who instantly becomes accustomed to its presence. Children are televisions largest audience, as Morris shows, “Children aged two to five look at the TV tube on an average of 28.4 hours a week; those between the ages of six and eleven average 23.6 hours a week”. Television has played an important role in many

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    Littleton, Colorado; Springfield, Oregon; Jonesboro, Arkansas; Pearl, Mississippi. These previously unknown suburban cities will forever be branded into our minds. These cities are linked by one devastating factor: young students firing upon fellow students and educators. What causes these young people to "snap" causing the violent shooting sprees? Although the events are too recent to fully understand their causes, we can try to understand what led to the disastrous situations. The impact of

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    Positive Television

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    wonderful television programs promote learning and growth. For example, according to the latest survey of the Department of Human Ecology, very young children who spent a few hours a week watching educational programs such as Sesame Street, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, Reading Rainbow, Captain Kangaroo, Mr. Wizard's World and 3-2-1 Contact had higher academic test scores three years later than those who didn't watch educational programs. Thus, preschoolers learn important skills such as spelling and reading

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    Effects of Television on Today's Youth

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    "Television viewing is a major activity and influence on children and adolescents. Children in the United States watch an average of three to four hours of television a day. By the time of high school graduation, they will have spent more time watching television than they have in the classroom. While television can entertain, inform, and keep our children company, it may also influence them in undesirable ways." (AACAP, 2001, p. 1) Even though parents are conscious that the media can affect their

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    Abstract It was not long ago that there was wide agreement among broadcasters, scholars, educators and parents concerning the ultimate goal of children's television programming: to educate. Today, it would be difficult to find even two people to agree on such terms. Popular opinion would lead us to believe that broadcasters now seek to exploit the youngest members of their audience--turning them into life-long viewers (and consumers). Scholars and educators woefully condemn television for

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    Television

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    educational television. Studying on how television stimulates imagination is done so with numerous techniques such as observation, inkblots, and questionnaires (Singer, 2003). The most research shows on imagination are on Sesame Street, Mister Rodgers Neighborhood, and Barney and Friends. Se... ... middle of paper ... ...age group can grasp Super Why, Word World, and Blues Clues (Moses). Repetition of a programing episode is important so a child can understand the main points. A preschooler may

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    PBS

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    PBS One time when I was six, I punched my sister in the face for taking one of my Oreo cookies. Why is this relevant? Well now that I'm older, I look back at the time we were both growing up and realize that we fought a lot. The only thing it seemed we both agreed on was what was on TV. We loved Sesame Street. No matter what we were doing, when that song came on we immediately nestled down in front of the TV. Now I can't speak for my sister or any other child that watched the show, but I was hooked

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    TV is NOT a Medium of Education for Children

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    The field of technology has seen continuous growth and advancement in society and has changed gears and is now heading for a road less traveled. The road, as bumpy and winding as it seems, as following a path dictated by television and all the powerful media. The television requires visual perception and is an inactive form of gratification for viewers. The hardest hits are the young children. Children shows like cartoon have positive and negative effects on the children, and the parents should not

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    A Zipper For Pee-wee Herman

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    alphabet or numbers each day, and relied on very short, animated cartoons with live and puppet segments which kept the interest of preschool children. The show was an instant outstanding success, and still broadcasts today. In 1970, "Mr. Roger's Neighborhood" was born. Mr. Fred Roger's used puppets and music to teach patience and cooperation, while providing guidance to help children cope with feelings and frustrations. Mr. Roger's land of makebelieve's handpuppet characters interacted with humans

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