Free Maurice Merleau-Ponty Essays and Papers

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    The objective of science is elucidate some sort of “truth” with regard to the world and how it works. But how do we arrive at this concept of “truth”? Epistomology, or the study of the origin, nature and limits to the production of human knowledge, provides a multitude of frameworks from which to work from. These approaches address the creation of knowledge and provide the scientist or observer with a reference from which to test the limits and validity of the knowledge that are created from research

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    PRIORITISING THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE IN DESIGN Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction 3 2.0 Heidegger, Norberg-Shultz and Merleau-Ponty 4 3.0 The Application of Phenomenological Principals in the work of Steven Holl 6 Thoughts 9 Glossary 10 Websites 10 Referenced Images 10 Bibliography 11 Notes 12 Architecture Phenomenology Philosophy Movement Spaces Dwelling Design Experience Theory KEYWORDS 1.0 Introduction Now it is time that gods emerge From things by which we dwell

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    Commentary

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    from Husserl and Merleau-Ponty’s thought” co-written by Maria Lucia Araujo Salada and Ruebens de Camargo Ferreira Adorno. The article gives a run through of the phenomenologies of both Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Edmund Husserl, in order to appropriate their theories into psychological nursing. The question written at the beginning of the second half of the article attempt to redefine the act of nursing through phenomenology. Then the author begins to describe how to use Merleau-Ponty’s work to

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    Auditory Phenomena

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    accurate construction of reality in the phenomenological sense of embodiment. Although they do not directly address auditory phenomena, I believe it is possible to connect sounds to the sense of embodiment that arises from Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Sound is a vibration or wave of air molecules caused by the motion of an object. The wave is a compression wave that travels through the air at a speed dependent on the temperature. Without movement there could be no sound. When an object moves

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    Identity, Perception, Action and Choice in Contemporary and Traditional "No-Self" Theories ABSTRACT: The ego is traditionally held to be synonymous with individual identity and autonomy, while the mind is widely held to be a necessary basis of cognition and volition, with responsibility following accordingly. However Buddhist epistemology, existential phenomenology and poststructuralism all hold the notion of an independent, subsisting, self-identical subject to be an illusion. This not only raises

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    phenomenology of Husserl, see: S. Ahmed, ‘Orientations: Towards a Queer Phenomenology', A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, vol.12, no.4, 2006, pp 543- 545. , while Merleau-Ponty notes that it is the connection between the mind and the body that enables us to interpret how we experience the world through our bodies L. Negrin, ‘ Maurice Merleau-Ponty: The Corporeal Experience of Fashion', in A. Rocamora and A. Smelik (ed), Thinking Through Fashion: A Guide to Key Theorists, London, I.B. Tauris, 2016, p. 115

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    Merleau-Ponty on Beauvoir's Literary-Philosophical Method ABSTRACT: Modern philosophy from the mid-nineteenth century on, has been particularly interested in choosing, adapting, and in some cases inventing literary forms to fit the particular philosophical subject under investigation. Simone de Beauvoir, with her explicit rejection of any formalist division between literature and philosophy, is one of the most interesting contributors to the modern development of philosophical writing. The waters

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    Time, Abram argues in “The Living Present,” cannot be viewed as a series of points on a timeline indicating so many present moments. Nor should time be separated from space and space separated from time. Abram noted that his family and friends seemed to dedicate a disproportionate amount of time trying to preserve the past and guarantee the future compared to the traditional people with whom he had been working. He found that he could tap into the “sensuous present” by imagining the future and

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    is touching and acting upon it, and each is at the same time Body”. This double sensation – being the perceiver and the perceived at the same time is a way to represent the body as an entity itself and also a network to the perceived world. Merleau-Ponty expands the discussion further considering the concept of the ‘reversibility’ of touch – as being the perceiver and the perceived - by thinking the possibility of

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    This essay will refer only to the three texts given here: M.M.P - Maurice Merleau-Ponty, The Primacy of Perception and Its Philosophical Consequences E.H - Edmund Husserl, Pure Phenomenology, Its Method, and Its Field of Investigation M.H - Martin Heidegger, The Fundamental Discoveries of Phenomenology, Its Principle, and the Clarification of Its Name Pure phenomenology takes as given the existence of an intersubjective world(1), ("the totality of perceptible things and the thing of all

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    Human Life And World

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    life-world by phenomenology is an accomplishment of 'permanent' significance. By briefly reviewing the meaning of the "world" and "life-world" in the writings of Husserl, Gurwitsch, Schutz-Luckmann, Ortega, Heidegger, Jonas, Straus, Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, I show that they all treat the world, or rather the affairs which comprise it, as passively present whether viewed as a mental acquisition or as the "Other." But the meaning of the world-as that wherein are met physical demands upon us which must

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    Essay On Haptics

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    Haptic: Of or relating to the sense of touch. Greek: haptikos, from haptesthai, to grasp, to touch. Seeing is believing, but touching is the truth. Haptics in Philosophy This essay is an exploration of the notion of the haptic in architecture. It will explore it in architectural design and in experience of architectural space. I will discuss perception as a precursor to haptics. In philosophical terms perception is how we understand our environment via our senses through identification and interpretation

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    Using Psychoanalysis to Understand Human Behavior According to Goethe, "We do not have to visit a madhouse to find disordered minds; our planet is the mental institution of the universe." Despite the hyperbolic nature of Goethe’s statement, it holds some truth. Because of this element of truth, society looks to psychoanalysis as an important tool for understanding human nature. Furthermore, psychoanalytic criticism of authors, characters, and readers has a place in literary criticism that is

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    Existentialism

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    historical convenience. The term was explicitly adopted as a self-description by Jean-Paul Sartre, and through the wide dissemination of the postwar literary and philosophical output of Sartre and his associates — notably Simone de Beauvoir, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Albert Camus — existentialism became identified with a cultural movement that flourished in Europe in the 1940s and 1950s. Among the major philosophers identified as existentialists (many of whom — for instance Camus and Heidegger — repudiated

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    Existentialism and its Reemergence in Postwar Europe Existentialism is a philosophical movement rooted in the work of the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, who lived in the mid-1800s. The movement gained popularity in the mid-1900s thanks to the work of the French intellectuals Jean-Paul Sartre, and Albert Camus, including Sartre’s Being and Nothingness (1943). According to existentialists, life has no purpose, the universe is indifferent to human beings, and humans must look to their own actions

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    Synesthesia and the Nature of Perception Although scientists do not fully understand the workings of the brain and perception, the basic concept seems fairly simple on an intuitive level. The brain interprets one set of stimuli in a specific way. Certain people with synesthesia, however, can experience a single stimulus in different ways. Are they naturally predisposed to hear red? Do these people have extra neural connections allowing them to taste green? Some scientists claim that all humans

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    prove some of her more radical idea’s such as examples from other philosophers, performativity, and worldwide examples on gender/sex. Some philosophers that seem to be of relevance to her fighting cause are Michel Foucault, Edmund Husserl, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and George Herbert Mead. Her use of the doctrine of constitution takes ‘the social agent as an object rather than the subject of constitutive acts” (Performative). In other words, Dr. Butler will question the extent to which we as a human

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    Introduction “The house is a machine for living in”. Famous quote from Le Corbusier which generated a lot of criticism and discussion. Should housing be seen as a machine or as an organism itself. With the development of human existence, the aspect of living is also changing trough the eras. This essay is devoted to the examination of the Le Corbusier’s Unité d’habitation and Steven Holl’s Simmons Hall. Regarding the aspects of how social hosing is being developed in the past century and today’s

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    Achieving True Happiness

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    Happiness is an encouraging feeling, which is influenced by many factors. When Layard states ‘from outside’ he means social identities, roles, cultures and groups people belong to. When Layard states ‘from within’ he is referring to a person’s thinking and feelings. Richard Layard (2005) in an attempt to find out what made people happy identified a list of factors that contributed towards happiness, this included family, close relationships, satisfying work, good health and personal freedom. ‘There

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    Religious scholar, Stephen Prothero, sees religion as a major organizing ideology to the social and political reality of the nineteenth-century. For Prothero, there is a close and intimate ideological relation between theological beliefs and a culture; therefore, they are not separable from characterizing the religious mood of the nineteenth-century. Prothero argues that many Americans were, “inspired by [the] republican rhetoric of liberty and equality, and by a popular revolt against deference

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