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    Legitimacy and Illegitimacy

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    most of his plays. Most of the family dilemmas he presents are directly correlated to disputes over power, whether it deals with sibling rivalry, parent rivalry, or some type of oedipal pairing. One of his compelling ideas surrounds the issue of legitimacy and illegitimacy when it comes to children and their parents. This dilemma continues to present itself in modern media, presenting a clear thematic imprint that describes a power dispute between the behaviors of legitimate and illegitimate sons

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    political legitimacy, as they did not receive their power through democratic means. It can be argued that political legitimacy is a means of justifying authority. What is political legitimacy? At this point, it would be useful to distinguish between political legitimacy and political authority. Buchanan stated that an authority has political legitimacy when “morally justified in wielding political power,” whilst political authority exists only where “in addition to possessing political legitimacy it has

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    Autonomy, Education, and Societal Legitimacy

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    Autonomy, Education, and Societal Legitimacy I argue that autonomy should be interpreted as an educational concept, dependent on many educative institutions, including but not limited to government. This interpretation will improve the understanding of autonomy in relation to questions about institutional and societal legitimate authority. I aim to make plausible three connected ideas. (1) Respecting individual autonomy, properly understood, is consistent with an interest in institutions in social

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    The Legitimacy of Electronic Scholarly Publishing At most institutions of higher learning in the United States and worldwide the emphasis is placed on the depth and breadth of the institution's research, at least as far as the institution's reputation and renown are concerned. An institution that does not produce much scholarly research in the form of conference activity or publication activity will not carry the same high regard as an institution which is much more involved in conference participation

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    Legitimacy and the Foundations of Legitimate Government In this paper, it is my intention to discuss the issue of legitimacy as it relates to government. I will explore what a legitimate government necessarily consists of; that is, I will attempt to formulate a number of conditions a government must meet in order to be considered legitimate. A logical starting point in an investigation of legitimate government would seem to be an account of the original purpose of government. Problems arise, though

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    Locke and the Legitimacy of the State: Right vs. Good John Locke’s conception of the “legitimate state” is surrounded by much controversy and debate over whether he emphasizes the right over the good or the good over the right. In the midst of such a profound and intriguing question, Locke’s Letter Concerning Toleration, provides strong evidence that it is ineffective to have a legitimate state “prioritize” the right over the good. Locke’s view of the pre-political state begins with his

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    authority. (1) The purpose of this paper is to rescue hypothetical consent from this objection. I begin by distinguishing political legitimacy from political obligation. (2) I argue that while hypothetical consent may not serve as an adequate ground for political obligation, it is capable of grounding political legitimacy. I understand a theory of political legitimacy to give an account of the justice of political arrangements. (3) I understand a theory of political obligation to give an account

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    American Hegemony in the Twenty-First Century: Consensus and Legitimacy Abstract: Since the end of the Cold War, the United States has been the world’s only unquestioned superpower. How the United States evaluates its position as global hegemon has important consequences for American foreign policy, particularly with regards to the potential for future policy constraints. Thus, this paper seeks to consider the question: How durable is American hegemony? The paper first defines the state

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    Transcendental Philosophy

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    individually acquiring the competence to judge the legitimacy of encountered propositional claims. Finally, Fichte confronts us with the idea of the identity of self-consciousness and objectivity. (1) Transcending ordinary life and experience to a somewhat higher being is surely not the scope of transcendental philosophy. What the revolutionary achievements of Descartes, Kant, and Fichte have generically in common is to account for the legitimacy of our knowledge claims or, in other words, for the

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    Microsoft Vs. Government

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    opportunity for radical innovation, and increased probability for lower prices. We will argue this claim with evidence acquired via the Internet and various periodicals. Though there may be substantial amount information that may defend Microsoft’s legitimacy, the claims against Microsoft and those who are being negatively affected stand to outweigh the positive attributes considerably. The key issue is what should the government do about the monopolizing strategies of Microsoft. The entities that

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    Habermas’ Between Facts and Norms: Legitimizing Power? ABSTRACT: To overcome the gap between norms and facts, Habermas appeals to the medium of law which gives legitimacy to the political order and provides it with its binding force. Legitimate law-making itself is generated through a procedure of public opinion and will-formation that produces communicative power. Communicative power, in turn, influences the process of social institutionalization. I will argue that the revised notion of power

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    Authority is the legitimate power while the dialectic will develop from a show of power and legitimacy. When there is cooperation at all places and time among people, cooperation acts as a source of power. Therefore, it is because of cooperation that differentiates the human being from their primitive tribe. The cooperation in a community attributes or shows their power. The power of the community is not determined by the number of people within an area but their general way of understanding each

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    Africa and Political Leadership

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    unconventional marital practices, and barbaric methods of discipline when describing these rulers, and overlook the qualities that resemble that of any ruler: their struggle to promote loyalty, inspire faith in their subjects, and establish their own legitimacy. Among the many African Traditional States, the tactics used to achieve these goals vary considerably. Shaka, a famous leader of Zululand, and the Manikongo, kings of the Kongo are two rulers whose systems of government epitomize African diversity

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    “Can This Campus be Bought?” is an essay written by Jennifer L. Croissant that speaks of the evils that come with sponsorships. Specifically, Croissant speaks of high schools/universities that sign brand deals with top notch companies (Nike, Pepsi, etc.) and how these brand deals affect the educational institutions. Sponsorships go much farther than just in colleges; they are everywhere, even if unnoticed. Croissant proposes strong opinions on the matter that are not necessarily true. Though some

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    Political Anarchy

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    individual consent is the longstanding, traditional theory of the authority of God. Other arguments follow a less anarchist view and are that of tacit consent and more specifically that of majority consent. The idea that consent is essential for the legitimacy of political authority can be argued against in many ways. Traditionally, the argument that God gave government authority was valid and in accepting religion we accept this as well. If you rebel against this order, you rebel against God. It was

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    Is Taxation is Theft?

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    the weaker members of society in any welfare state. Taxation is justified through constitutional law and social convention, and so any rejection of taxation’s legitimacy is a direct condemnation of the legitimacy of the law, the legitimacy of the State, and the appropriateness of this social convention. Any claim that denies the legitimacy of such responsibilities and powers is a claim in favour of anarchy. Thus, the claim taxation is theft has the inferential meaning that government is illegitimate

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    Is Socrates Guilty As Charged?

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    measure of guilt or innocence is only as valid as the court structure to which it is subject to. Therefore, in considering whether Socrates is 'guilty or not', we must keep in mind the societal norms and standards of Athens at the time, and the legitimacy of his accusers and the validity of the crimes that he allegedly committed. Having said this, we must first look at the affidavit of the trial, what exactly Socrates was being accused with: "Socrates does injustice and is meddlesome, by investigating

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    Law: Gideon Vs Wainright

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    common knowledge being that it is among the most basic rights given to the citizenry of the public. However, the simple manner in which this amendment is phrased creates a "gray area", and subject to interpretation under different circumstances. The legitimacy of the right to mount a legal defense is further obscured by the Fourteenth Amendment which states, "No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States." As a result, many questions

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    Toward a Postmodern Theory of Law

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    Toward a Postmodern Theory of Law* ABSTRACT: Law at the end of the twentieth century is a practice based on legal-philosophical concepts such as the representational theory of truth, neutrality, universality, and legitimacy. The content of such concepts responds to the tradition of the western cultural paradigm. We share the experience of fragmentation in this cultural unanimity: we live in a world of heterogeneousness and multiplicity that upholds the claims of different concepts of the world

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    The next character I will mention is Honorable Gilbert MacWhite, who replaced Ambassador Sears in Sarkhan. This character functioned in complete contrast to Sears. He understood the sensitivity of the US mission in Sarkhan and how vulnerable the Sarkhanese government was to potential communist influences. He also understood the communist threat and did not underestimate it. MacWhite’s understanding of the operational environment was clear from the beginning and made constant efforts in understanding

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