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    Japanese Art

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    Japanese Art Japan’s Art, although sometimes over looked has evolved through many different periods. Its simplest forms in the Archaic period and last on its more complex period the Ego Period. Even though some skeptics believe that Japanese art can not compare to the art of the Greeks or Romans. Japanese Art yet simple is refreshing and has left Japan with wonderful shrines, paintings and traditions. The periods of Japanese art are the Archaic, Ask, Heian, Kamakura, Askikaga and the Ego

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    Essay On Japanese Art

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    Art in Japan and art in the United States have their similarities and their differences, while also being viewed in different ways. Every work of art is unique in its own way. There are many different types of art, but each work of art has its own meaning. Depending on the eye of the beholder, a work of art can relate to you in many ways, and can be taken apart like a puzzle in your mind to understand the deeper aspect of it, while also deciphering its message. Others may not relate to the work,

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    History of Japanese Art

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    Throughout many centuries, art has portrayed an exceedingly dominant role in Japanese culture. These forms of artwork varied from everything from pottery to clay figurines. Overall, the majority of Japanese art was and still is considered to be of high importance in Japanese history. However, the most intriguing and unique form of art was the Isho-ningyo and Iki-ningyo dolls, otherwise known as the "fashion doll" and the “living doll”. Both the Isho-ningyo and the Iki-ningyo were merely two of the

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    Japanese Martial Arts

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    Japanese Martial Arts In Japan, especially during the earlier periods of Japanese history such as the Tokugawa, physical adeptness was much revered and valued. This was mainly because of the fact that these strengths were the basis on which much of the population depended upon for survival during these fairly turbulent periods. Throughout time, Japan has been a very organized and scrupulous society, and even its style of physical combat has been sorted into specific categories according to what

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    Aikido the Japanese Martial Art Aikido is a Japanese martial art currently practiced throughout the world. Behind the powerful catapulting throws and immobilizing locks and pins of Aikido lie some very simple principles: remove yourself from the direct line of your enemy’s attack, and through the absorption and deflection of the force of the attack, your enemy is taken out of balance and defeated by the energy of his or her own aggression. Aikido does not use strength against strength, but

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    There are many aspects of Japanese culture and society that make it one of the most well-liked countries in the world today, at least according to the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands Index. The technological innovations stemming from the country and the reputation of companies such as Honda, Toyota, Nintendo, and Sony make for an international focus on Japan’s industrial prowess. Added to that is the ever-rising popularity of manga and anime, and altogether, they form a strong nationalist feeling

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    Buddhist Japanese Art

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    Introduced by a mission from Korea in 552 C.E., Buddhism has long been a central theme in Japanese artwork. Since the king of Paekche, a kingdom in the South East of the Korean peninsula, first gave the Japanese emperor a bronze Buddha statue, the Buddhist art forms that were periodically introduced from China and Korea were tempered in the crucible of local custom and usage, to yield a rich tradition of religious art. The role of Buddhism in Japan was greatly amplified during the life and reign of Prince

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    Takako Azami’s Plum and Maple Trees

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    traditional art. This new creation is also evidently integrating into Japanese contemporary art, with additional emphasis on the aesthetic mixture of the East and the West. Takako Azami’s Plum and Maple Trees, 2009 (Figure 1) is an amazing example of this new cultural invention. The work was a part of the “DOMANI: The Art of Tomorrow 2009,” The Achievements of the Japanese Government Overseas Study Program for Artists Provided by the Agency for Cultural Affairs Exhibition at The National Art Center,

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    THE LIFE CYCLE OF AN ARTIFACT What is an artifact? According to the dictionary, an artifact is “something made or given shape by man, such as a tool or a work of art, especially an object of archaeological interest” ("The Definition of Artifact"). In archaeology, the word “artifact” defines an object recovered by archaeological attempt, which might have a cultural attention. In the same way, the article “The Life of An Artifact” written by Michael Shanks mainly discusses some of the key points of

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    Buddhist Art in Japan

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    Buddhist Art in Japan Buddhism had an important role in the development of Japanese art between the sixth and the sixteenth centuries. Buddhist art and religion came to Japan from China, with the arrival of a bronze Buddhist sculpture alongside the sutras. Buddhist art was encouraged by Crown Prince Taishi in the Suiko period in the sixth century and Emperor Shomu in the Nara period in the eighth century. In the early Heian period Buddhist art and architecture greatly influenced the traditional

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