George Macdonald

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  • The Grandmother in the Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald

    2072 Words  | 9 Pages

    The Grandmother in the Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald The characterizations of women have, throughout history, been one of the most problematic subjects in literary tradition. An extraordinary dichotomy has existed with women as being both the paragon of virtue and the personification of evil. Ancient Greeks feared women, and poets such as Hesiod believed the female sex was created to be the scourge of the gods and the bane of men (Fantham 39). Romans, on the other hand

  • The Germanic and Celtic Tradition by George MacDonald

    954 Words  | 4 Pages

    The Germanic and Celtic Tradition by George MacDonald One of the most interesting things about fairytales is how the author has borrowed ideas from ancient myths and legends and kept them alive in their writings. The Princess and the Goblin is one of these fairytales. In writing this novel, George MacDonald has incorporated much of the folk tradition in his characters and plot. Specifically, his concept of goblins seem to be drawn from the tradition of dwarfs, gnomes, and kobolds of Germanic

  • The Origins and Purpose of the Goblin Queen in George MacDonald´s the Princess and the Goblin

    2303 Words  | 10 Pages

    The Origins and Purpose of the Goblin Queen in George MacDonald´s the Princess and the Goblin Whatever the purpose of a story may be, whether the tale is a philosophical, moralizing or merely entertaining one, an assortment of characters with sufficient depth, notability and believability is vital to shoulder the burden of the author’s intent. George MacDonald, in one of his most famous novels, The Princess and the Goblin, displays an acute awareness of this fact, presenting us with some of

  • Sir John A. Macdonald

    870 Words  | 4 Pages

    Sir John A. Macdonald Sir John A. Macdonald was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on January 10, 1815. His fathers name was Hugh Macdonald and his mothers name was Helen Shaw. His father had migrated to Glasgow from the town of Dornach. His father was a very pleasant and easy going guy and he alwasys wanted to make everyhting better but he usually made things worst. He was a man that had lots of friends, he would talk a lot and drink too. His mother came from Spey Vally. His mother was a very

  • The Three Conference

    580 Words  | 3 Pages

    the premier of the Province of Canada, John A. Macdonald, asking to join the negotiations by the Atlantic premiers. The request was then brought to London and was accepted by the Colonial Office. As a solution to their difficulties, the members requested the consent to attend the meeting of the colonies in order to spread the word of the British North American Union. During the Great Coalition, John A. Macdonald, George- Etienne Cartier and George Brown led their political parties to help stop political

  • George MacDonald's The Princess and the Goblin

    1667 Words  | 7 Pages

    George MacDonald's The Princess and the Goblin All over the world people have believed in a race of creatures, superhuman and subhuman, that are not gods or ghosts, but differ from humans in their powers, properties, and attributes (Briggs, Vanishing 27). The concepts of these creatures/fairies have been passed down through generations in many cultures through forms such as songs, sayings, and stories. Stories such as folktales and myths have wide array of fairy types found in them from various

  • Heaven and Hell Divided in C. S. Lewis's The Great Divorce

    1002 Words  | 5 Pages

    not transparent. The narrator’s solid person, or teacher as he calls him, is George MacDonald and is introduced at the beginning of chapter 9. George MacDonald is a famous writer and C. S. Lewis has never tried to hide the fact that he admires Mr. MacDonald. On page 65 C. S. Lewis mentions MacDonald’s book Phantastes and explains how much this book and his other works influence him. George’s character is the mentor type, put into the story to explain the divine, and

  • The International Financial Crisis in 1929

    829 Words  | 4 Pages

    a socialist party, Macdonald had always argued that since they were a government without a majority, they must act in a way that would reflect this, hence his and several other Labour MP's wish to act in traditional fiscal policy by balancing the budget in 'national interest'. The May Committee's suggestion showed clearly this divide within the party, which forced Macdonald to offer the party's resignation. He was, however convinced by King George V to remain as Prime

  • George MacDonald's The Princess and the Goblin

    1318 Words  | 6 Pages

    George MacDonald's The Princess and the Goblin In his novel The Princess and the Goblin, George MacDonald has cleverly crafted an underground society populated by a distorted and "ludicrously grotesque" race. Within the body of his tale, he reveals that these people are descended from humans, and did in fact, once upon a time, live upon the surface themselves. Only eons of living separated from fresh air and sunlight have caused them to evolve into the misshapen creatures we meet in this story

  • The Three Conferences: The Independence of Canada

    909 Words  | 4 Pages

    the premier of the Province of Canada, John A. Macdonald, asking to join the negotiations by the Atlantic premiers. The request was then brought to London and was accepted by the Colonial Office. As a solution to their difficulties, the members requested the consent to attend the meeting of the colonies in order to spread the word of the British North American Union. During the Great Coalition, John A. Macdonald, George- Etienne Cartier and George Brown led their political parties to help stop political

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