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    Structure of fatty acids: Differentiating between fatty acids can be in two main ways: the length of free fatty acid chains and the fatty acids degree of saturation. The number of carbon atoms determine the length of fatty acid chains which often categorized as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), and Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) with aliphatic tails longer than 22 carbons, while the number of double bonds between carbon atoms

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    Explain the fatty acid synthesis reaction, noting the role of each domain of fatty acid synthase. 
 - the main premise of FAS is to attach two C acetate units from malnoyl CoA to a growing chain and then reduce it. The 4 steps include condensation of the growing chain with acetate, reduction of the carbonyl into a hydroxyl, dehydration of the alcohols to trans alkene, and the reduction of alkene to alkane. 13. What role does ACP and CoA play in fatty acid synthesis? 
 - ACP delivers

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    Fatty Acids are Needed for Growth

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    Fatty Acids are Needed for Growth The lipids of our central nervous system contain high proportions of arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6, AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3, DHA) which are the two most important polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain. Levels of linoleic acid (18:2 n-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3 n-3) are low, usually less than 1% to 2% of total fatty acids (Innis, S78-79). Linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid are precursors to AA and DHA; they are elongated and desaturated

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    Fatty Acid Synthesis and Cancer

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    Introduction Fatty acid synthesis plays a vital role in homeostasis within the human body. The process of fatty acid synthesis regulates energy metabolism and provides fuel in times of starvation1. This process also synthesizes biomolecules that are important to life during embryonic development and lactation in mammary glands2. An overproduction of synthesized fatty acids is implicated in disease states such as obesity, liver disease, and cancer3. The fatty acid synthase (FAS) complex performs

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    Introduction Transfatty acids (TFA) may be described as polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids holding non-coupled carbon-carbon double bonds in the trans form, disrupted by at least one methylene group(1). These trans fatty acids are formed by a process called hydrogenation to produce fats that have the firmness and plasticity desired by food manufacturers and consumers(2). Trans fats are gaining popularity in industrial sector owing to its low cost, potential

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    Omega 3 Fatty Acids And Heart Disease Prevention As heart disease continues to be one of the leading causes of death for Americans each year, scientists and the society as a whole strive to find effective ways of preventing this sometimes stoppable killer. Every thirty-two seconds a person in the United States dies from cardiovascular disease. That is over 900,000 Americans die each year from this killer. Coronary heart disease is one of the diseases grouped with cerebrovascular disease and peripheral

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    Anti-obesity effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids Introduction In recent years, obesity has become a significant health problem in industrialized countries such as the United States. Obesity is strongly associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease, and congestive heart failure. The World Health Organization has defined obesity as one of the top ten global health problems. High-fat diets containing large amounts of

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    More and more research studies are finding that getting enough Omega-3 fatty acids is critical to our health in many ways. Omega-3 fats are essential for the survival of the human body, but our bodies can't manufacture them on their own, so we need to get them from the foods we eat. Good dietary sources of Omega-3 fatty acids are fish and seafood, like salmon, tuna, sardines, halibut, herring, algae and krill, plus some plants and nut oils such as flaxseeds and flaxseed oil, canola oil, soybeans

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    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or simply NAFLD, describes a condition where excess fat accumulates in the liver of people who consume little or no alcohol at all. Although some amount of fat may accumulate in the liver of a normal individual, having fat that takes up to five to ten percent of your liver weight can cause fatty liver disease, which may lead to serious health problems. What is Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease ? The liver is a large, complex organ with many vital functions. One

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    driven conformational change in Fatty Acid Binding Protein Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are a class of cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acid. Their major role includes shuttling of free fatty acid to appropriate organelles for different metabolic fates within the cell. FABP is important to fatty acid trafficking due to the low solubility of fatty acid, a common characteristic of molecules with long hydrocarbon chain. To overcome this obstacle, fatty acids binds to FABP to enhance

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