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    Duke Ellington

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    Duke Ellington The Harlem Renaissance was an era full of life, excitement, and activity. The world in all aspects was in gradual recovery from the depression. The world of music was expanding, sharing it’s enthusiasm throughout the world. The evolution of jazz aroused the curiosity of the nation. As Blacks received their freedom, they were able to express themselves as talented individuals. Certain blacks contributed immensely to the era of jazz, for example, Duke Ellington. Ellington entered

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    Duke Ellington

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    Duke Elington Duke Ellington was an American jazz bandleader, composer, and pianist. He is thought of as one the greatest figures in jazz. The French government honored him with their highest award, the Legion of Honor, while the government of the United States awarded him with the highest civil honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He played for the royalty and for the common people and by the end of his fifty-year career, he had played over 20,000 performances worldwide. He was the Duke

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    Duke Ellington

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    Duke Ellington was born Edward Kennedy Ellington on April 28, 1899 in Washington, D.C. to Daisy and James Ellington. They served as the ideal role models for young Duke and taught him everything from table manners to the power of music. He was eight when he got his first piano lessons. By the age of fourteen, he was sneaking into Frank Holliday’s poolroom. He learned from his experiences in the poolroom how to appreciate the value of mixing with a wide rage of people. He attended the Armstrong Manual

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    Said to be the father of jazz, Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington, born on April 29, 1899, was an American composer, pianist, and leader of a jazz orchestra. Duke Ellington was known and is remembered for his unique and profound style of jazz music. His development in jazz was one of the most spectacular in the history of music, as demonstrated by more than fifty years of sustained achievement as an artist which led him to be known as one of the greatest musicians of the 20th century. Duke’s music was

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    Duke Ellington

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    Edward Kennedy Ellington, American jazz composer, orchestrator, bandleader, and pianist, is considered to be the greatest composer in the history of jazz music and one of the greatest musicians of the 20th century. He composed over 2000 works and performed numerous concerts during his musical career. A compilation of some of his most popular music is collected on a CD called "The Popular Duke Ellington." Ellington personally created most of the music played by his orchestra. He often wrote

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    I decided to do my research paper on Duke Ellington who was a famous jazz composer, and pianist. Ellington gained national fame in the mid-1920s, through his appearances at the Cotton Club with his orchestra. Ellington is considered one of the most famous jazz composers of his time. Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington was born on April 29, 1899 in Washington D.C. His mother Daisy, surrounded Edward with her very polite friends which taught him to have respect and manners for people. After a while his

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    Duke Ellington in the 1920’s The 1920’s were a time of excitement, fun, experiments, and the rise in African American talent. Duke Ellington took part in this time to boost his career and have fun. Duke Ellington is a songwriter and performer in many great songs throughout the 1900’s. “The Jubilee Stomp”, written by Duke Ellington, reflects the fun and exciting times of the 1920’s, but it also shows us the rise of African-Americans and the Harlem Renaissance. The 1920’s were about change and expressing

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    A Portrait of Duke Ellington By Tracy Frech Duke Ellington is considered to be one of the greatest figures in the history of American music. Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington was born in Washington D.C. on April 29, 1899. His parents were James Edward and Daisy Kennedy Ellington. They raised Duke as an only child, until his sister, Ruth, was born when Duke was sixteen years old. Duke, even as a teenager, had a great talent for music. In the beginning of his musical life, Duke began to take a promising

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    Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974) was an American composer, pianist, and bandleader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death in a career spanning over fifty years. Born in Washington, D.C., Ellington was based in New York City from the mid-1920s onward, and gained a national profile through his orchestra's appearances at the Cotton Club in Harlem. In the 1930s, his orchestra toured in Europe. Though widely considered to have been a pivotal figure

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    Duke Ellington : An American Legacy Where would music be had it not been for the men that stepped before him. The Mozarts and Beethovens, who wrote the music that today is known as the classics. These men were naturals in their own right, but these people wrote their music in the 17th and 18th century. Many people don't realize all of the changes that music had to go through between that period of music and the present day. One such musician stands alone at the top as one of the movers and innovators

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    Edward Kennedy Ellington, more commonly known by his nickname “Duke” was one of the most influential jazz musicians and composers in the world. He won 14 Grammy awards, was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and won countless other awards for his accomplishments. Ellington has inspired jazz artists across the globe and is continuing to do so today even after his death. In this biography, I will be telling you about Duke’s journey to fame and success; beginning with his childhood, and then

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    Duke Ellington, named Edward Kennedy Ellington at birth, was born on April 29, 1899, in Washington D.C. to James Edward Ellington and Daisy Kennedy Ellington. Both of Ellington’s parents were talented, musical individuals. Edward Kennedy was later nicknamed Duke by his childhood friend, Edgar McEntire and this name has stuck with him throughout his life and career. Duke Ellington was one of Jazz and Big Band’s most influential icons. He was known for famous recordings such as “Sophisticated Lady”

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    Recognized as one of the greatest all time jazz figures Duke Ellington, whose career reached over a span of fifty years was mostly known for composing thousands of influential songs. As well as constituting into jazz an ensemble of western sounds which was referred to as “American Music”. This iconic figure has left a mark in the world of jazz for centuries to come. Edward Kennedy Ellington better known as Duke Ellington, since a very young age had an intellectual musical intuition. At the young

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    Duke Ellington's Legacy

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    world. Duke Ellington wasn’t the normal everyday hit artist with just one or two big hits we hear on the radio and call great, he was simply a legend. This man was the real deal in the jazz world; he was one of the main guys who put jazz on the map. Duke Ellington didn’t just become great though; just like everyone else, he had to start from the bottom. He had to make his own story. He had to separate himself from others and make a name for himself. This is the story of how Duke Ellington made himself

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    still greatly appreciated today. It is believed that African Americans would not be where they are today, if the renaissance had not occurred. The Harlem Renaissance brought a new sense of identity to African Americans such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Billie Holiday; they were no longer defined as worthless objects in society, they had begun a life beyond that. Louis Armstrong was an African American musician whose fame skyrocketed during the Harlem Renaissance. In 1912, Armstrong started

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    Biography of Edward Kennedy Ellington “I’m just an up and coming musician struggling to find another new note.” -Duke Ellington Edward Kennedy Ellington was born April 29th 1899 in Washington, DC. From an early age, Ellington was instilled with solid, conservative morals. He was taught to pride himself and his family and to achieve to the utmost of his dreams. At such a crucial time in the history of the African American, there was a struggle to be accepted and to fit into the American

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    Duke Ellington was a popular jazz musician of the 1920s and beyond his music impacted how future musicians will play. He wrote 2000 to 3000 songs in his career and published over 200 albums. Ellington played the piano, alto and tenor saxophone along with being a bandleader. Duke Ellington became such a famous jazz player because his music was diverse, he toured the world with “The Washingtonians” and he won multiple awards that helped him spread his name across the globe. Duke Ellington’s journey

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    Music Essay

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    successful in Duke Ellington's band was Jimmy Blanton. Jimmy Blanton was an American jazz double bassist. He joined Duke Ellington's band in 1939. He was credited for starting more complex pizzicato and arco bass solos in a jazz context than previous bassists. Blanton created some of the first essential bass solos in jazz like some compositions from Ellington like "Ko Ko," "Jack the Bear," and "Concerto for Cootie." Also, he recorded a cycle of duets with his bandleader, Duke Ellington on piano, the

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    regard. Jazz music was born and bred in the south, which is why musicians like Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Ella Fitzgerald are common names here. The average person knows that these musicians rose to achieve musical success and national fame. However, most people are unaware of how these musicians affected each other’s lives both directly and indirectly. Although Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington were faced with discrimination and animosity at the beginning of their careers, people eventually

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    Black, Brown and Beige Black, Brown and Beige is a Jazz symphony composed by Duke Ellington that first premiered in 1943. This symphony holds great importance to the black community, because it was written in a tone about the Negro journey in America. It is one of the longest works composed by Duke Ellington with three parts. In this composition he targets racial identity in the African American community, and also gives a spiritual sense to the music by featuring Mahalia Jackson; a popular gospel

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