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    Federal Food and Drug Act of 1906 The drug portion of the FDA was necessary to ensure that the drugs and medicinal components being shipped in from other countries were to the standards of the American Medical Association. There were no controls over the substances being imported for medical use to ensure the purity and “freshness”. As a result, “US soldiers in the occupation of Mexico suffered from inadequate medication for malaria” (Janssen 1981). Although there is no longer an association of

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    The Orphan Drug Act

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    The Orphan Drug Act The term orphan drug refers to a product that treats a rare disease affecting fewer than 200,000 Americans. Orphan drugs help the companies that manufacture them, under the Orphan drug act. Under the act a small company can pick up a product that would be worth anywhere from $5 million to $20 million a year. The orphan drug act has helped in the development of products to treat drug addiction, leprosy, hemophilia, and rare cancers, as well as diseases most people have never

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    Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” and the Pure Food and Drug Act Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle,” gave the most in-depth description of the horrid truths about the way America’s food companies, “the only source of food for people living in the city,” are preparing the food they sell. “The Jungle” describes the terrible conditions of a Lithuanian family that moved to the US, and had to work, live, and die for the food companies in Chicago. “The Jungle” spurred a movement in the American people to

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    cumpuandid drags, end on must cesis, biceasi uf cuntemonetoun. On thi 25th uf Siptimbir 2013, thi Drag Qaeloty end Sicaroty Act, elsu knuwn es H.R. 3204, wes ontrudacid, end thrii deys letir, wes pessid by thi Huasi uf Riprisintetovis. On thi 18th uf Nuvimbir, thos Act clierid thi Sineti. On thi 27th uf Siptimbir, 2013, Prisodint Bereck Obeme sognid thi Drag Qaeloty end Sicaroty Act ontu lew (coti 2). Beckgruand: Cumpuandid drags eri drags thet eri moxid by e locinsid phermecost, on e locinsid phermecy

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    Progessives and The Pure Food and Drug Act

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    that was a prime example of the progressive era, was the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. This law came about due to muckraking, and also because of public and political interests. Muckraking, such as Upton Sinclair’s piece, “The Jungle”, helped in the timing of the adoption of this legislature. This piece of legislature, allowed for the regulation of processed food items in United States food markets. The Pure Food and Drug Act was assigned to the Department of Agriculture under the Bureau of Chemistry

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    Support Drug Regulation Acts

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    959—Pharmaceutical Compounding Quality, Security and Accountability Act, was introduced into the U.S Senate May 15, 2013 by Thomas Harkin, Democratic senator of Iowa, along with the support of five cosponsors. The bill, if it’d passed would have amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) to expand the regulation of compounded drugs. It would have allowed the Federal Government to oversee drug compounders’ operations to ensure drug quality and safety. Most recently, the bill was referred to

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    The Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906

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    In 1906, the Pure Food and Drug Act, that was years in the making was finally passed under President Roosevelt. This law reflected a sea change in medicine-- an unprecedented wave of regulations. No longer could drug companies have a secret formula and hide potentially toxic substances such as heroin under their patent. The law required drug companies to specify the ingredients of medications on the label. It also regulated the purity and dosage of substances. Not by mere coincidence was the law

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    1906 Pure Drug and Food Act • This act was the first time that there were regulations on food and drugs, and resulted from the unsanitary methods used in the food industry that were revealed by Upton Sinclair in his book “The Jungle”. The purpose of this act was to prohibit: interstate transportation and sale of contaminated food, the transportation and sale of deceptive medicines, and exaggerated claims of effectiveness for medicines. It also prevented contamination of food and drugs, as well as

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    Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986

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    The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 was policy pushed into legislation on the heels of public outcry over the death of University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias. The basketball star, who two days earlier was drafted 2nd overall in the NBA draft, died of cocaine intoxication. Ten years prior, President Nixon declared a “War on Drugs” in America. He hoped that propaganda and social encouragement would move America to change its perception on drugs. Going so far to ask influential figures like Elvis

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    Americans have been experimenting with drugs since the 19th century, it wasn’t until the 20th century that addiction and dependence started to become a problem that the country continues to try to deal with it today. Asian immigrants were associated smoking opium; crack/cocaine and heroin was associated with blacks; latinos and hispanics were associated with marijuana; methamphetamine in the 1990s was associated with homosexuals and poor white people. Racial tension against these unwanted groups

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    The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986

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    The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 [the Act] was enacted for several reasons. One of the provisions of the act was to introduce mandatory minimum sentences for individuals who are convicted of possessing a particular amount of crack cocaine and powder cocaine. Individuals convicted with possession of 5 grams of crack would receive a mandatory minimum of 5 years in prison. Individuals convicted with possession of 500 grams of powder cocaine would receive the same 5 year mandatory minimum sentence

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    the Federal Food and Drug Act of 1906 As one of the primary federal consumer-protection laws in existence today, The Federal Food and Drug Act of 1906 was a law that had two primary goals for food and drugs: (a) forbid harmful ingredients and additions and (b) demand labeling of ingredients to inform consumers. According to Janssen (1981), it was hoped that the enactment of this law would eliminate adulterations and poisons sometimes found in foods, sometimes in drugs and often in both. The

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    The Jungle                   It’s a Jungle Out There Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle (1906) gives an in depth look at the lives of the immigrant workers here in America.  In fact the look was so in depth that the Pure Food and Drug Act was created as a result.  Many people tend to focus purely on the unsanitary conditions instead of the hardships faced by the workers.  Actually I think that Sinclair doesn’t want the focus on the meatpacking, but on overcoming obstacles, especially through Socialism

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    Theodore Roosevelt

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    businesses, he and Congress passed the Hepburn Act. The Hepburn Act says that “railroads can only charge the amount that is set by the government, and that the government was able to inspect financial records“#. The Pure Food and Drug Act, which brought about the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was next. This act says that all foods and drugs had to be tested and approved by a government official before they went onto the market. The Meat Inspection Act, “enabled the United States Department of Agriculture

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    The Jungle

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    unfortunate workers who fell into the machinery for grinding meat and producing lard. Within months of The Jungle's publication, the sale of meat products dropped dramatically. The public outcry of indignation led to the passage of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act. However, Sinclair did not write The Jungle to incite the American government into regulating the sanitation of the meat packing industry. The details regarding the unsanitary and disgusting conditions in meat packing factories are background details

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    The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 On December 8, 2003, President Bush signed into law the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 (Pub. L. 108-173).  This landmark legislation provides seniors and individuals with disabilities with a prescription drug benefit, more choices, and better benefits under Medicare. It produced the largest overhaul of Medicare in the public health program's 38-year history. The MMA was signed by President

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    MORPHINE

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    MORPHINE Morphine is a narcotic analgesic drug, which means that it is a downer painkiller. It is most commonly given intravenously (by injection) for more rapid results, but it can also effectively be given orally. It has a remarkable ability to reduce physical distress, and its calming effect protects against exhaustion in traumatic shock, internal hemorrhage, and several other conditions. This drug is truly a miracle worker. Morphine is an opiate, coming from the poppy seed. It was first isolated

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    the youth that are in court right now but cannot stay at home, E is the girls unit, G unit is for the boys who committed minor crimes and felonies, and F unit is for the boys who committed major crimes and felonies such as sexual assault and dealing drugs. What first drew me to YDC was the fact that an ex-boyfriend of mine almost went there in the eighth grade, and was a troubled kid just like them. I could see a little bit of him in each of the residents and by trying to help them it felt like I was

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    Steroids

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    androgenic steroids: steroids, which act like testosterone. These steroids are used to treat inflammatory disorders such as cortico steroids, which do not have anabolic effects. Testosterone in the male is produced mainly in the testis, an a small amount is being produced in the adrenal. It is synthesized from cholesterol. The regulation of its production may be simplified which means the hypothalamus (part of the brain) produces gonadotrophin releasing hormone which acts on the anterior pituitary to increase

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    Most students, by the time they reach college, have taken numerous MCA tests (Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments), NWEA tests (Northwest Evaluation Association), and either an ACT test (American College Testing) or SAT test (Scholastic Assessment Test), depending on which region of the United States they are from. Webster’s defines a standardized test as “any test in which the same test is given in the same manner to all test takers.” Every student who has had any type of education knows what standardized

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