Free Dorian Gray syndrome Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Best Essays

    The Monster Dorian Gray

    • 2258 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited

    In the Victorian era where vanity was the main attraction, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray gave insight into the true horrors that came of this sinful nature. Wilde was a very controversial figure and he meant to stir the pot when he wrote this disputed story. He believed that literature was not only meant for the imagination, but for the moral mind as well. In The Picture of Dorian Gray he depicts the importance of becoming a well rounded individual and also explains himself. In one

    • 2258 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Better Essays

    Analysis of the Women in The Picture of Dorian Gray Sibyl falls head over heels in love with Dorian Gray, willing to commit her life to him after only two weeks. Lady Henry hardly knows her husband, to whom she has been married for some time. Because neither woman is in a stable and comfortable situation, both eventually take drastic measures to move on. Therefore, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, both Sibyl Vane and Lady Henry are weak, flighty, and naive. The weakness of women is found in

    • 1140 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Picture of Dorian Gray Harry is Pan, the piper who leads Dorian on his path to destruction, decadence, and moral decay. As with Pan, the merry and much-loved god, the victim of the god's attention does not fare well. As Pan had Syrinx and Echo, Harry has Dorian. Pan caused madness and panic with his passions; Harry seems to have had the same result with Dorian. Wilde reveals much of Harry's character in the writing. His is the predominant voice; he delivers most of the dialogue. Is Harry

    • 813 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde's novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, explores the themes of influence, corruption and conscience. “The obvious influence of Lord Henry upon Dorian shows how one may corrupt another to such an extent that one's own conscience withers and dies”(Weintraub 116). Basil Hallward, a painter, knows the corruptive influence that Lord Henry can impose upon his model, Dorian Gray. Basil does not want Lord Henry to even meet Dorian because he is afraid that Dorian will

    • 3042 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Picture of Dorian Gray as a Moral Book The Picture of Dorian Gray was a remarkably well-written book due to the reaction of its themes by society.  In the preface of the novel, Wilde introduces the opinion that "...there is no moral or immoral book.  Books are well written or badly written.  That is all."  Numerous views can be taken upon this fastidious comment.  Many would agree that Wilde is justifiably correct because the preface was written with the intention that his readers understand

    • 1000 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Conscience of Dorian Gray in Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray Much of the criticism regarding The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde has dealt with Dorian Gray’s relation to his own portrait (Raby 392). While some may argue that the portrait represents a reflection of Dorian Gray’s character, this is only a superficial analysis of the novel and Dorian’s character. While Dorian Gray’s true character never changes, it is his own perception of his character (his conscience) that

    • 2861 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    or jail time. But in extreme cases the penalty is death. In The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde uses the influence of Lord Henry Wotton as well as the portrait of Dorian Gray to represent this corruption and its consequences. Wilde emphasizes Dorian’s beauty and youth in order to signify his innocent nature. Dorian is described as handsome, good looking, and beautiful throughout the novel. Lord Henry even calls Dorian an Adonis (in Greek mythology a youth who fell in love with his own image

    • 1639 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    A Comparison of Oscar Wilde and Dorian Gray

    • 1315 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    A Comparison of Oscar Wilde and Dorian Gray One novel that stands out as literary masterpiece is The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. Wilde wrote a dark tale of a man, Dorian Gray, who destroys his life by exchanging his soul for eternal youth and beauty. The character of Dorian Gray, in many aspects, mirrors the self-destruction of the author's own life. Therefore, Oscar Wilde portrays his own life through Dorian Gray, the main character of the novel. Oscar Fingal O' Flahertie Wills

    • 1315 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    A Critique of the Ending of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray Truly, suspense is a positive attribute – up to a certain point. Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray ends with too many loose ends. What did Alan Campbell do to Dorian that was “stern, harsh, offensive”(Wilde 125)? It appears that whatever Campbell did was quite serious: when Dorian threatens to send a letter to someone regarding Campbell’s past misconduct, Campbell agrees to get rid of Basil’s corpse, which is a serious

    • 938 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Inner and outer beauty in Dorian Gray

    • 1492 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    misleading. In order to get to know the person we need to look to the inside – into the soul. This is the place where the real beauty and ugliness are hidden. The notion of inner and outer beauty is perfectly presented in the novel ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ by Oscar Wilde. The story described in this book shows how the external attractiveness influences people’s behavior and corrupts the inner beauty. The plot situated in the XIX England perfectly describes the higher class of this period. Shallow

    • 1492 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Picture of Dorian Gray "The soul is a terrible reality. It can be bought and sold. It can be poisoned or made perfect. There's a soul in each one of us. I know it." This is a statement made by Dorian Gray to his best friend, Lord Henry, a few hours after he realizes that his behavior of the last eighteen years has been absolutely terrible. First I shall explain the way Dorian Gray lost his ability to be good and how he found it again eighteen years later. After Sybil Vane's death,

    • 708 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    "The picture of Dorian Gray" is morality, and how it can be influenced. The main characters in C. S. Lewis' novel, Mark and Jane Studdock, go through very contradicting paths and join opposite in objectives, organizations; at the same time they share similar feelings (solitude, confusion, paranoia) and carry out immoral actions in the attempt to run away from the problems. On the other hand, in Oscar Wilde's novel, the young, beautiful, inexperienced, naïve, Dorian Gray; influenced by

    • 754 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    In the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde the eponymous character Dorian follows the lifestyle of New Hedonism. This lifestyle advocates a complete abandon to your impulses, and does not believe in following social dictates or morals. The book illustrates the long-term effects of new hedonism, showing the destruction and death Dorian creates due to following this creed, eventually leading him to complete madness and his own destruction. When Dorian Gray first meets Lord Henry at the

    • 1255 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    In The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde introduces Dorian Gray as a mysterious and beautiful young man. He has no opinion and is very similar to a ball of clay, in the sense that he has no opinion and is free to be molded by whoever takes interest in him. Basil and Lord Henry both take interest in the young man. While both praise his physical beauty, Lord Henry wants to turn him into a hedonist minion. He convinces Dorian that he is a perfect candidate to live life according to his pleasure and

    • 933 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Indulging Dorian Gray

    • 934 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    much like Basil Hallward, the painter in The Picture of Dorian Gray, the story of a young man’s soul that he trades for the eternal youth and beauty of a portrait. Dorian’s sins are painted onto the canvas while his own face is left unmarred by the horrible acts he commits. Dorian is a young, naïve, innocent boy; with an impressionable nature that allows him to become seduced by Lord Henry’s fantastical views on life, love, and beauty. Dorian soon realizes the power his own beauty possesses, and hastily

    • 934 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    If you can get past most of the superficial and unlikeable characters in The Picture of Dorian Gray, this story does indeed have its place in the horror genre. While I understand the setting and the characters were a reflection of the actual class distinctions during the Victorian time period, I found the shallowness and narcissism of Dorian Gray and his circle of acquaintances tedious. "Fops" came to mind more than once along with "don't these people have a purpose other than to dine out and indulge

    • 792 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Dorian Gray Group Assignment

    • 1811 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    deed is kept away from view with his beautiful mask, and it is here that Dorian becomes sickeningly delighted with the ease that he can fool the world. He is not a complete villain without any realization of his own sins, yet the fact that he slides into a composure of innocence with a sense of “terrible pleasure” shows how far he has gone into corruption, and how futile it will be to redeem himself (Wilde 128). 2. Dorian is suffering under the guilt of his murder, yet he seeks release from it

    • 1811 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Wilde Versus Hedonistic Society

    • 1158 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    and what consequences it would bring. In his novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde brings the light that breaks through the shadows surrounding aestheticism. He makes his argument against a purely hedonistic lifestyle through his use of figurative language, such as diction, symbols, and characterization. Wilde uses rather strong diction to express his distaste for the hedonistic lifestyle, which the protagonist, Dorian Gray, as well as his friend, Lord Henry Wotton, chooses to live. For example

    • 1158 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Best Essays

    The Picture of Dorian Gray

    • 2300 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    (Wilde,115). The author reveals pleasure as the driving force of many characters within Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, but this search for pleasure becomes fatal once taken into the hands of Dorian Gray. Throughout the novel Dorian Gray changes his opinion on pleasure based on what he requires in order to escape reality. With each death and misdeed he is responsible for; Dorian must search harder for a more drastic form of release. His path declines from his innocent beginnings with Sybil

    • 2300 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    and harm to the child. Societal flaws are paralleled in literature to act as foils of society. This concept is reflected in characters that represent caricatures of humanity in the novels Wuthering Heights, The White Tiger, and The Picture of Dorian Gray. ... ... middle of paper ... .... Shop It To Me Inc, 20 June 2013. Web. 29 Mar. 2014. Goldsen, Rose K., and Charles Morris. "Varieties of Human Value." American Sociological Review 22.1 (1957): 111. Print. Hafley, James. "The Villain in Wuthering

    • 1671 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 9 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays