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    her moral sentiments? To a great degree, the economi... ... middle of paper ... ..., 1820-1865. Columbia Studies in American Culture Series (New York: Columbia University Press, 1942): 13-14. Cott, Nancy F. The Bonds of Womanhood: "Woman's Sphere" in New England, 1780-1835. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1977. Dublin, Thomas. Women at Work: the Transformation of Work and Community in Lowell, Massachusetts, 1826-1860. New York: Columbia University Press, 1979. Dublin, Thomas. "Women

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    wanted to destroy something. The crash and clatter were what she wanted to hear.” The scene neatly encapsulates Edna’s rage at being confined in the domestic sphere and foreshadows her increasingly bold attempts, in subsequent chapters of the novel, to break through its boundaries. At first glance, the room appears to be the model of domestic harmony; “large,” “beautiful,” “rich” and “picturesque,” it would appear to be a welcoming, soothing haven for Edna. However, she is drawn past its obvious

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    speakers is emphasized, which forces readers to examine the sanity of their own notions of gender dynamics. In the Victorian age, the idea of separate spheres was an integral part of society. Men’s roles involved participation in the marketplace of the industrial society. Women, on the other hand, were expected to remain in the domestic sphere. They were assigned subordinate, and often passive roles, whereas men played direct roles in an industrial society, therefore being active agents. William

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    John Steinbeck's The Chrysanthemums

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    that this one was one of the hardest for him to write (Timmerman 38). It was a “story of a woman he couldn’t get out of his mind” (Timmerman 169). “The Chrysanthemums” is symbolic of Elisa’s failed attempt to escape her mechanical life and the domestic sphere that entraps her femininity and her true self. The symbolic nature of this story relies on the creation of images of isolation, routine/mechanical lives, and oppression. A feeling of the isolation of the couple and Elisa individually is created

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    Today’s American women are following centuries old traditions of rebelling against society’s outlook on women around. Earlier in America’s history, it was unheard of for a woman to be in both the public and domestic sphere. Women were forced to spend most of their life in the domestic sphere, and wear ridiculous clothes everyday. For a long time, women have been degraded and pushed around, causing women to initial movements to change the way society treats women. In America, “the land of the free”

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    century were acknowledged as nothing more than housewives, and were expected to play that particular role with a smile on their faces. Women were to "find happiness in their chimney corners" (Norton). "Women remained essentially confined to the domestic sphere" (Tindall and Shi). Women's rights were to be nonpolitical in nature, confined to the traditional feminine role of wife and mother. Where is the justice? In the Declaration of Independence, we are granted inherent liberty, yet women, small property

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    have inhibited American society from developing its full potential. She deviates from conventional wisdom, which says that gender roles have been largely detrimental to only half the population, which is simultaneously confined to working in the domestic sphere and prevented from participating in the public realm. Her theory says that Americans subscribe to a "sexuo-economic system" which reduces men to "mere earning mechanisms" and forces women to "become parasitic wives" (6, 4). As she explains, members

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    Bertha must be kept silent

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    aristocrat of his era, and is reluctant to be his subordinate. She questions women’s position in society with regard working rights and equal opportunities. She does not comply with the conventional norm which forces women to be restricted to the domestic sphere only. On the contrary she wants to take full advantage of her keen intellect, as a man in her position would normally do. Above all, she, a servant, marries her master, thus disturbing the social order. Nevertheless, despite the revolutionary

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    Originally, most of the gender specific legislation in the United States was passed because stereotypes regarding women pervaded the mentalities of many of our nation's lawmakers. Slowly the government realized that women had been sealed into the domestic sphere and attempted to reverse this discrimination by giving women special compensations. In some instances the treatment women received was leftover from old notions of role typing, while in others, laws directly tried to remedy harmful effects of

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    "Ordinary" Women in Early Twentieth Century Southern Arizona: Lives that Shaped the Frontier Experience Some historians have argued that women’s roles in early 20th century Arizona centered exclusively around the domestic sphere and typified values of femininity such as passivity, motherhood, and loyalty to marriage. Their journeys to the West are likewise portrayed as involuntary and life on the frontier a hated struggle. For example, Christiane Fischer states, “Frontier conditions tended

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