Free Detective Fiction Essays and Papers

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  • Isolation in Detective Fiction

    1299 Words  | 6 Pages

    In detective fiction, authors create chaos, which they balance with a sense of structure and reason. They implement many elements to entice the reader to continue with the detective on his quest to solve the riddle and defeat the chaos, which can be divided into two sections: noticeable chaos and silent chaos. Noticeable chaos includes elements such as murder and thievery, obvious aspects of detective fiction that make the reader cringe. Silent chaos, on the other hand, includes locked rooms and

  • Detective Fiction

    1161 Words  | 5 Pages

    Why Ask Why? The most important part of any type of book or story is that it be interesting. This proves to be particularly important in detective fiction as well. What could be more interesting than having a crime committed in front of you, given all (or most) of the details and still not be able to figure it out? This is exactly how detective fiction authors draw people into these stories and books. By weaving an intricate and interesting plot full of fascinating characters, and all types of details

  • Tzvetan Todorov's Detective Fiction

    852 Words  | 4 Pages

    Tzvetan Todorov views detective fiction as literature that speaks for itself and needs no introduction. According to Todorov, detective fiction should adapt to its new genre instead of going beyond traditional literature (43). Todorov views detective fiction as two separate entities: the crime that establishes the groundwork of the story and the investigation that backtracks the crime in a logical manner. Todorov believes that these stories, “in their purest form,” are completely independent from

  • To what extent do the detective fiction stories looked at imitate

    1682 Words  | 7 Pages

    To what extent do the detective fiction stories looked at imitate The Murders in the Rue Morgue in terms of the character and the creation of tension? Question: To what extent do the detective fiction stories looked at imitate 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' in terms of the character and the creation of tension? This essay will explain, discuss and examine the effects of Edgar Allen Poe's 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' had on other authors writing detective stories during the 19th century

  • Detective Fiction & Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    1283 Words  | 6 Pages

    “for a book to be described as detective fiction there must be a central mystery and one that by the end of the book is solved satisfactorily and logically, not by good luck or intuition, but by intelligent deduction from clues honestly if deceptively presented.” (James. 2009: 16). This is traditionally conducted via a detective; a figure deployed within the narrative structure ‘whose occupation is to investigate crimes’ (Oxford. 2006: 202). Therefore detective fiction represents an enigma, a puzzle

  • Detective Fiction & Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    1799 Words  | 8 Pages

    “for a book to be described as detective fiction there must be a central mystery and one that by the end of the book is solved satisfactorily and logically, not by good luck or intuition, but by intelligent deduction from clues honestly if deceptively presented.” (James. 2009: 16). This is traditionally conducted via a detective; a figure deployed within the narrative structure ‘whose occupation is to investigate crimes’ (Oxford. 2006: 202). Therefore detective fiction represents an enigma, a puzzle

  • Detective Fiction & Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    1799 Words  | 8 Pages

    “for a book to be described as detective fiction there must be a central mystery and one that by the end of the book is solved satisfactorily and logically, not by good luck or intuition, but by intelligent deduction from clues honestly if deceptively presented.” (James. 2009: 16). This is traditionally conducted via a detective; a figure deployed within the narrative structure ‘whose occupation is to investigate crimes’ (Oxford. 2006: 202). Therefore detective fiction represents an enigma, a puzzle

  • Successfully Breaking the Rules of Detective Fiction in Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and Ruth Rendell’s A Judgement in Stone

    1968 Words  | 8 Pages

    “Mystery fiction is a game with rules, an intellectual competition between writer and reader. To keep the game honest, both writer and reader must be playing by the same rules” (Miller). Some of the conventional rules of detective fiction are listed in S. S. Van Dine’s “Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories” and Ronald Knox’s “10 Commandments of Detective Fiction.” However, some of the ‘rules’ Knox and Van Dine list do not extend to Ruth Rendell’s A Judgement in Stone and Agatha Christie’s The

  • Compare The Speckled Band, The Red Headed League and Silver Blaze as Examples of Detective Fiction

    1436 Words  | 6 Pages

    The birth of classic detective fiction was originated just in the mid nineteenth century, and was producing its own genre. Classical detective fiction follows a set of rules called the ‘Ten commandments of detective fiction’. The genre is so popular it can bee seen by the number of sales in any good book stores. Many of these books have been created a long time ago and there is still a demand for these types of books. The popularity is still ongoing because it provides constant entertainment, and

  • Overview of Miss Marple

    1364 Words  | 6 Pages

    to last a long time in my life. If I had had any second sight I would have provided myself with a precocious schoolboy as my first detective; then he could have grown old with me” (Agatha Christie 2011, 436) This is what Agatha Christie, the queen of crime fiction, stated in her autobiography about one of her most famous characters, the elderly female amateur detective Miss Jane Marple. It is doubtful, however, whether a “precocious schoolboy” would have ever reached the same worldwide fame as the

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