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    The Destructive Nature of Technology

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    From that first day that man discovered fire, the human race has continued its never-ending search to accomplish tasks in the most expedient manner possible. Society has decided that technology can be used to solve most of its immediate problems. This quest has brought us many useful things such as the telephone, the automobile, the oven, the CD player, etc. and has made living a little more enjoyable. If that were all, there would be no need to even mention these facts other than to advertise them

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    Dreams in Buffy the Vampire Slayer

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    in Buffy the Vampire Slayer The battle between Good and Evil. Nothing could be more timeless or universal. And each week, when presented as a contest between a teenage vampire slayer named Buffy and legions of vampires, demons, and assorted destructive forces on the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, millions of modern American television viewers watch that conflict as represented in late-nineties popular culture. As any frequent TV viewer knows, Good wins, vanquishing Evil with some

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    Destructive Colonization Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness As a man is captured, his first instinct is to try and break free from his shackles and chains. Primal urges such as this often accompany humans when they are forced, as in capture, to rely on their most basic instincts to survive. In this manner, natives in Africa acted upon instinct when the Europeans arrived to take their land and freedom. The short story Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell and the novel

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    to accept fates assigned by computer projections and historical analysis - they sought to change the world before it was too late. Fortunately, such a situation has yet to occur. But William Faulkner suspects that man's essentially self-destructive nature will lead to ultimate doom, and has constructed the parable of the Compson family in The Sound and The Fury to illustrate how the human race will react to realizing their end. Specifically, each member of the family represents a segment of

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    perfect through his pride (tragic flaw). Secondly, his radical reversal of fortune is made clear after he struggles with the recognition of his fatal flaw. Thirdly and lastly, his pity and fear flowers into an understanding of his prideful and destructive nature leading to his redemption. Nevertheless he is left with the burden of the deaths of his family, becoming a shell of misfortune and loneliness. Although Creon's actions cannot be labeled as courageous, his character traits pertain greatly

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    Urbanism movement has begun among planners, designers, and builders. Though it does not provide complete solutions to many of the environmental problems caused by human development, it shows a greater awareness of the undesirable and potentially destructive tendencies exhibited by conventional methods of design, planning and construction. Robert Davis, board chairman of the Congress for the New Urbanism, describes the problem of urban sprawl and development. "For five millennia, we have built towns

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    becomes an environmental issue and a feminist issue. To combine the two ideologies, ecofeminism creates a more complex thorough analysis of the destructive nature of militarism. Ecofeminism creates a new understanding and a new vision of criticizing the established military culture that exists in our world today. Ecofeminism links the oppression of women and nature as one in the same. The same system that exploits and oppresses women also turns and degrades the environment. The military destroys the environment

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    appropriate setting for the witches because caves tend to represent the under-world and hell, creating a feeling of evil. The witches appearance, "secret, black, and midnight hags" also indicates their evil nature. The witches dark meeting place and dark appearance all emphasize their destructive nature. Macbeth in Act 4: consulted with the witches, murdered Macduff's family, and continued to create chaos in Scotland. Macbeth  in Act 4 is described as an agent of disorder, "untitled tyrant  bloody-sceptered"

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    Enlightenment project. Enlightenment has no claim to being less a myth than the mythology it failed to escape. This new myth is defined for them by the drive to dominate nature at the expense of alienation of man from nature and from his own inner nature. They follow the appearance of the subject as it is objectified alongside nature, and is dominated with it. The subject becomes an object and his intellect becomes instrumental, and all instinct and sensory experience that fails to be productive in

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    The Assertive and Vulnerable Wife of Bath Society was different in Chaucer's time; males dominated and women were suppressed.  The manipulative and destructive nature of women was emphasized by men. Much like Eve in the Bible, women were blamed for the 'downfall of man'. Through the Wife of Bath, Chaucer investigates the difficulty of self-realization for a woman in this restrictive environment.  The wife of bath, Alison, represents antifeminist stereotypes and searches for happiness and a place

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    Electric Cars

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    and also one’s social demands. Most people would not be able to travel around a country or the world without this incredible machine, for it provides freedom and mobility, even for people who do not own a car. Unfortunately, the car has a very destructive nature. Automobiles make a major contribution to air and noise pollution, the depletion of fossil fuels, and the abnormalities in children and adults due to lead poisoning. Although our economy currently defends on gasoline- powered cars, it is my

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    The Disease to Follow Is a Greater Threat

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    Influenza" it has spread beyond Spain, Europe and America. Cases from as far as the Orient and even Africa have been documented and verified. Clearly, this is no ordinary flu. However, I believe that this flu is extraordinary not only in its destructive nature, but in casting a legacy of distrust for science amongst the general populace. In Sierra Leone the flu was brought from Europe and become a deadly epidemic. A report claims that as many as 1,000 individuals had died there in a single week

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    the King and Jean Cocteau's Infernal Machine both authors focus on the arrogant nature of Oedipus. Since this quality ultimately has destructive powers, the relationships Oedipus has with other characters demonstrates this arrogance. Although, the two authors portray Oedipus in different ways to emphasize their different themes both use the relationship between Oedipus and Teiresias to demonstrate Oedipus' arrogant nature. In both plays, this arrogance manifests in Oedipus' rejection of the prophet

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    these four verses. In essence, God has told us to take care of the world for him and that is our great responsibility. More rules however, appear in other books of the Bible. For example in Deuteronomy 20:19-20[2], God reminds us of the destructive nature of war as all available wood was used to make siege towers. The people were told to leave the fruit trees so they could get fruit. In Exodus 23: 10-11the idea of fallow fields, giving the field a chance to revive is introduced. Similarly

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    We Must Make Changes in AIDS Education

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    knowledge of HIV and AIDS. These students were born in the early eighties at the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. Teachers guided students through years of health classes in their junior high and high school years and informed students about the destructive nature of the AIDS virus and ways in which it can and cannot be contracted. Health educators made sure that students were well-informed about HIV and presented the topic as being gender neutral. Although pop culture and the media claimed that homosexual

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    differences. Douglass's Narrative brings an ugly era of American history to life as it weaves through his personal experiences with slavery, brutality, and escape. Most importantly Douglass reveals the real problem in slavery, which is the destructive nature of intolerance and the need for change. Douglass refers many times to the dehumanizing effects sla... ... middle of paper ... ...s not solely about rote memorization and the three R's or anything else that can be tested with a bubble sheet

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    Pa Chin's Family

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    main driving forces in disruption in Kao family tradition would have to be the rebellious youth, Chueh-min, Chueh-hui, and Chin in particular. The family's personal encounters with the destructive nature of the traditional family have forced them to think in modern ways so they will not follow the same destructive path that they've seen so many before them get lost on. In this new age struggle for happiness within the Kao family a cultural barrier is constructed between the modern youth and the traditional

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    a necessity instead of a vice and materialism has become a way of life. The characteristics of the modern world surround the importance of the attainment of material possessions and the conformity of its citizens. It also coincides with the destructive nature of mankind. According to Dewey, society is divided into two classes: the working class and the intellectual class. The modern age consists of a “spirit of progress which consists of a manifest of change in fashions, invention of new machines

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    The Mayor of Casterbridge

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    Afterwards, Henchard becomes a wealthy man and the mayor of the town Casterbridge. His wife and child seek him out years later. In the end, it is neither his supposed child, Elizebeth-Jane, nor his wife, Susan, who ruins him but his own self-destructive nature. The novel was published serially in the Graphic and in Harper’s Weekly. The Graphic was the English version and Harper’s Weekly was the American version. They ran concurrently over the nineteen-week period from January second to May fifteenth

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    Oil Spill Response

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    or small, have long been of concern to pollution control authorities in this country. Due to its destructive nature, once an area has been contaminated by oil, the whole character of the environment is changed. When it has encountered something solid to cling to, whether it be a beach, a rock, the feathers of a duck or gull, or a bather’s hair, it does not readily let go (Stanley, 1969). By its nature o... ... middle of paper ... ... Issues Resources Series 5 (61): 18-20. Max, N.E. 1969. Oil

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