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    warrior woman—Deborah! (While playing tension-filled, fast-paced music, the screen zooms out from the talk show's empty headquarters to the picturesque Washington D.C. skyline, then to the whole county, the satellite pans towards Israel and zooms back in at triple the speed, where we finally we meet up with our host Kyla: Hello and welcome to "The Old Testament: Real People, Real Places, Real Stories", I'm your host, Kyla Weckel and today we will be joined by the lovely Deborah. She will answer

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    Deborah Tall's From Where We Stand In her book, From Where We Stand, Deborah Tall, tells us the story of coming to Geneva, New York, to begin teaching. It is a personal account of coming to terms with a new and foreign place. It gives us the chance of watching her learn about landscapes, people, and history. It moves through time, through her own life, and especially through motherhood. In the end, and after more than a decade, she gives us the signs of what it means to live out of and within

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    Deborah Sampson was born in Plympton, Massachusetts Dec. 17, 1760. She was very poor growing up soon her father deserted their family to go out to sea then she found out he died in a ship wreck. She was an indentured servant for over six years before she became a teacher. Later in her life she became a teacher she did not like how woman were being treated so she dressed up like a man and joined the army she was in the 4th Massachusetts regiment in 1782. She hid her leg wound so doctors could not

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    Verifying the Theories of Deborah Tannen's You Just Don’t Understand: Women and Men in Conversation with an Episode of Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher The book You Just Don’t Understand: Women and Men in Conversation, written by Deborah Tannen, is an analytical book offering scientific insights on the conversational differences between women and men. The book is copyrighted 1990 and is still read and widely talked about all over the world. Tannen is a Professor of Linguistics at Georgetown

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    Cabaña in Tifton, Georgia, so I made a reservation for Friday at six o'clock in the evening. I was not prepared for the swift curve ball thrown at me during our date. After my experience on the date, I realized that my views started to clash with Deborah Tannen’s book “You Just Don’t Understand” that women focus more on intimacy and

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    It is as if a window finally cracks open revealing the sun’s rays brightening with the truth that men and women experience different challenges. Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women has to face the music when applied to Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women. In Tannen’s essay the claim that “[t]here is no unmarked women” has trouble withstanding but manages to hold up Woolf’s position of the battle women fought against the traditional norm to the freedom they can possess. First and foremost, Tannen claims

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    Analysis of You Just Don't Understand, Men and Women in Conversation by Deborah Tannen In the first chapter of her book, You Just Don't Understand, Men and Women in Conversation, Deborah Tannen quotes, "...studies have shown that married couples that live together spend less than half an hour a week talking to each other...". (24) This book is a wonderful tool for couples to use for help in understanding each other. The two things it stresses most is to listen, and to make yourself heard

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    largest secret, the secret of her personal safe haven. To Deborah, opening up about the Kingdom of Yr, sparked her fear that the haven in which she finds safety, has potential to be destroyed in the hands of another individual. During the earlier stages of the novel, Deborah’s fear for the destruction of Yr ran deep, as without the Kingdom she would no longer have an outlet to run towards during her period of hurt. The fears in which Deborah experiences, also linger towards the emotional pot brewing

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    tone of this story starts out right in the beginning and her mother and father are quite distraught because of the daughter’s illness and the fact that they must trust the doctors; they seem to not trust anyone. They even told their own family that Deborah is at convalescent school, not a mental institution. Of course the time period of the book is much earlier than now so it is more understandable why they were upset. Hopefully parents now are less ignorant and would try and be proud of their child

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    Rose Garden, is a description of a sixteen-year-old girl's battle with schizophrenia, in the 1960s. Deborah Blau’s illness spanned three years, in which she spent her life in a mental institution. The book itself is a semi-autobiographical account of Joanne Greenberg’s experiences in a mental hospital during her own bout with schizophrenia. She presents her experiences by relating them to Deborah. The novel was written to help fight the stigmatisms and prejudices held against mental illness. In

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