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    DEAF TECHNOLOGY

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    DEAF TECHNOLOGY Individuals who are deaf or are hearing impaired are faced with many problems in today’s world. There are so many tasks and activities that are done today that deaf or hearing impaired people may have difficulty doing because of there handicap. There handicap used to stop them or inhibit them from doing something that they are interested in or there friends and neighbors would do. However in today there are new and different technologies, that help the deaf and hearing impaired

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    Deaf Education Technology

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    Deaf Education Technology Technology has advanced our school systems and provides many new and helpful products into the classrooms. Technology has also provided specialized products for students that are hearing impaired. There is no lack of opportunities for the deaf and hard of hearing in the school system. There are many ways to innovate the way they learn. Children learn best through a visual mode. Providing an environment where the child can learn things through the use of their

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    The purpose of this research paper is to examine how assistive technology can be fully utilized to enhance the learning experiences of the educational environment for children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Presently, there are major issues within our educational system when it comes to finding ways to produce, fund, and implement assistive educational technologies that will “level the playing field” for deaf and hard-of-hearing students and provide them with equal access to a reasonable education

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    Deaf Technology Essay

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    Technology is something that seems to bring people together, but in reality can bring people farther away when technology not optimized for certain groups. Many groups are left out of new technology, especially the deaf and elderly. These groups deserve technology just as much as people the technology is originally geared towards. Technology is meant to bring people closer together not isolate groups from each other. However, despite the technology not being fully optimized for these groups, it has

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    Deaf Culture History Essay

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    The deaf community does not see their hearing impairment as a disability but as a culture which includes a history of discrimination, racial prejudice, and segregation. According to PBS home video “Through Deaf Eyes,” there are thirty-five million Americans that are hard of hearing (Hott, Garey & et al., 2007) . Out of the thirty-five million an estimated 300,000 people are completely deaf. There are over ninety percent of deaf people who have hearing parents. Also, most deaf parents have hearing

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    Dogs And Hearing Dogs

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    can be deaf man’s best friend too! Dogs are trained for many things these days, such as police assistants, guards, and normal house companions. However, there is a new dog in town! The term “hearing dog” sounds like a strange concept for hearing folks, however it’s become very common in the deaf world. These dog’s have helped many deaf people adapt in the hearing world, and have saved many lives with their capabilities. The first company to start the hearing dogs business is “Dog’s for the Deaf”. They

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    Today there is controversy in deaf culture as whether it is better to orally train a child or expose them to signing. In this paper, I will look at the quality of speech developed in deaf children, predictors of speech development, and language abilities of deaf children who are orally trained versus deaf children who are exposed to a fluent sign language. Children with hearing loss develop speech slower than children who are hearing. Speech development can be broken down into intelligibility, noun

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    seems that another medical hurdle for humanity is leapt. A new cure for another disease or disability seems to cross the horizon at least once a year. For those affected by even minor disabilities, modern technology often provides an answer. In the case of hearing loss for instance, the technology to at least partially overcome has existed since the early 80’s. While not a complete cure, as results and effectiveness vary from patient to patient, Cochlear implants seem to a simple answer available to

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    Diversity in Education

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    and students alike, especially for ethnic-minority Deaf students. Compared to American students, ethnic-minority Deaf students have different needs that require accommodations in the types of instruction methods from teachers. Because of the diversity within the Deaf community, it is important to stress on the importance of ethnic-minority role models for deaf college students, the academic preparedness of ethnic-minority deaf students, the deaf students’ level of comfort on campus, and the success

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    sentence structures. Sign language comes into practice wherever Deaf societies come into existence. Sign language is not identical worldwide; every country has its own language and accents; however, these are not the verbal or transcribed languages used by hearing individuals around them. British sign language (BSL) is a form of communicating using hands, facial expressions and your body language, it is mainly used by individuals who are deaf. BSL is entirely acknowledged language and does not depend

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