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    National Crisis

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    capable of learning life’s basic necessities we will start breaking down the wall of stupidity social promotion has built. Social promotion, the national crisis, is the promotion of students to the next grade level without mastery of their current curriculum.(www.ncrel.org) "More than half of teachers surveyed in a recent poll stated that they had promoted unprepared students in the last school year, often because they see no alternative." (www.ed.gov) If a teacher sees no option for a student

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    A Perfect Education

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    their children's education aren't always informed about the student's progress, aren't aware of the current curriculum, and don't have any idea of the student's strengths and weaknesses in school. An involved parent is informed and sometimes included in the decision-making process. Parents who take an active role are kept informed of the progress made by their children. The parents know the curriculum and assist the children with their nightly studies, and can discuss their children's feelings about

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    Critical Thinking Is More than Common Sense

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    international trade relations between other countries important to the U.S.?” they would receive fragmented responses at best; few students would be able to provide clear and concise answers. This simulated example clearly underscores some of the current flaws in the education system across the nation. Instructors teach students, and expect them to learn; they do not teach them how to learn. Many educators have taught students well how to compile trivia and miscellaneous facts, but few have truly

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    We Must Make Changes in AIDS Education

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    from the curriculum: the more numerous negative effects that the disease has for women. Health education needs to present the effects of AIDS to women and encourage them to be more concerned about contracting and living with the disease. In spite of this need for reform, however, health educators may feel uneasy about changing their curriculum and argue that there are a number of reasons to keep HIV and AIDS curriculum the same. One reason that they might have for maintaining the current curriculum

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    Revising Education

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    CLASSROOM STRUCTURE The education system in the United States is completely confused; I do not think that any attempts to modify the current system will ever work. Deborah Tannen also sees this problem. She sees the disorder lying in a gender gap, miscommunication between sexes, and a battle between man and woman in the classroom. Tannen thinks the current curriculum can be successful if we only work out the few kinks between the male and female learning process. I disagree, I believe this country

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    Music in the Classroom

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    be made to allow students another pathway to connect to topics and the current curriculum should be changed to include the musical intelligence as this pathway. Teaching styles would also have to be changed to include a more music oriented style of learning. This change should be made smoothly starting with the youngest children, and completely changing the teaching styles and curriculum before students can learn the current style of teaching. Teachers of young children have learned most of their

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    behind their healthier, properly fed peers. The current educational practices of testing children for kindergarten entry and placement, raising the entrance age to kindergarten, adding an extra "transitional" year between kindergarten and first grade, and retaining children in preschool, kindergarten, or first grade are attempts to obtain an older, more capable cohort of children at each grade level. These educational strategies suggest that current curriculum expectations do not match the developmental

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    Effect of the Malaysian curriculum review blueprint on the current curriculum in schools First question: Describe on one effect of the Malaysian curriculum review blueprint on the current curriculum in schools. Based on the question given, it means that I need to give one effect of the blueprint and six points to support it. For me, it is not an easy question and sincerely, I answered and described based on my reading through the Ministry of Education website. Some of my answers and explanations

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    The twentieth century produced innumerable great and influential writers from all over the world. There are many that belong to the period studied, roughly from 1910s to the 1960s, who could arguably and justifiably be studied on the module alongside the masters of modernisms already on the syllabus - Kafka, Woolf, Joyce and Eliot. Authors such as Arthur Miller and his Death of a Salesman, F. Scott Fitzgerald with The Great Gatsby or Marcel Proust with his In Search for Lost Time have made it considerably

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    understanding it,” (p. 127). For this reason, the purpose of this literature review is to study curriculum theory and the diversity in curricula (i.e. definitions, characteristics, and functions), which may aid in describing the relationships and influences it has on the course taking patterns and trajectories of high school students. With recent research on high school curriculum shifting from examining curriculum from a path-like knowledge to a more map-like knowledge

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