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    Common Sense

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    Common Sense. By Thomas Paine. Edited with an Introduction by Isaac Kramnic. (New York: Penguin Books, 1986).   	Recently, I acquired a copy of Thomas Paine’s most recent patriotic pamphlet, entitled Common Sense. I was immediately interested in what Paine had to say in his new work, after such powerful previous works, such as The Crisis series. I was nothing less than astonished at how Paine so powerfully conveyed his patriotic message. Paine theorizes a split between England and the

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    Common Sense

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    In Common Sense, by Thomas Paine writes that America cannot recon ciliate with Great Britain. Paine gives many examples in this document of why America cannot reconsolidates with Great Britain. One of them is there is no advantages to being connected to Great Britain; only disadvantages can come out of the connection and the second idea is British government must sooner or later end. In the first point about the connection with the British, Paine states that America can benefit much more if it was

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    An Analysis of Common Sense

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    independence.  The loudest and most convincing of these belonged to Thomas Paine, born in England and living in Philadelphia.  His pamphlet, Common Sense, expressed the argument for American independence in a way no one had before and had a great influence on the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Paine had only lived in America for two years when he began writing Common Sense, but that was enough for him to witness the oppression of the British.  He had been dismissed as a tax collector in England after

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    Common Sense and Conflict Michael Eisner is an American entertainment executive, whose leadership in the 1980s and 1990s revitalized the Walt Disney Company. Born in New York City, Eisner was educated at Denison University, where he studied literature and theater. After graduating in 1964, he worked for six weeks as a clerk at NBC and then briefly in the programming department at CBS. His career crystallized at ABC, which he joined as a programming assistant in 1966 and where he spent the next

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    Common sense, is it really all that common? Ever encountered a person who seems very intelligent, but handles a task differently than what is expected to be the common way of doing it? Did they seem to be acting a little dumb and confused, like they were never taught how to do the task at hand? This behavior represents someone who does not use common sense or that has never been exposed to thinking outside of the box. These types of people may have been taught one way of doing things and never

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    Psychology is not just common sense

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    The Frenchman Descartes described common sense as: Good Sense is, of all things among men, the most equally distributed… And in this it is not likely that all are mistaken: the conviction is rather to be held as testifying that the power of judging aright and of distinguishing Truth from Error, which is properly what is called Good Sense or Reason… but solely from this, that we conduct our thoughts along different ways, and do not fix our attention on the same objects. For to be possessed of a vigorous

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    Thomas Moore Lacked Common Sense Moore was a great philosopher. He really deserves a hand for his proof for an external world. Moore did something that no other philosopher had done before or has done since; he successfully proved the existence of an external world. Not only did he prove the existence of an external world in fact, but he also did it rather briefly and with no further resources necessary than his own two hands. Once one is acquainted with Moore’s proof, it becomes evident

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    Common Sense, Practicality, and the Literary Canon In keeping with my more-or-less conservative views, it seems obvious that what is most lacking in the English culture-war debates is a little common sense and practicality. Take, for example, the question of the literary canon (by which I mean the canon of imaginative literature: fiction, poetry, and drama). In his preface to Falling Into Theory, David H. Richter articulates three basic positions on the issue of the standard or traditional

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    Critical Thinking Is More than Common Sense

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    If one were to ask a group of high school seniors questions like, “Who was the first U.S. president?” or, “What equation is associated with the Pythagorean Theorem?” they would likely discover that the majority of the students would answer correctly. However, if one were to pose the questions, “Why did the Civil War occur?” or, “Why are international trade relations between other countries important to the U.S.?” they would receive fragmented responses at best; few students would be able to provide

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    Common Sense, Ethics, and Dogma in The Wife of Bath In his Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer assembles a band of pilgrims who, at the behest of their host, engage in a story-telling contest along their route. The stories told along the way serve a number of purposes, among them to entertain, to instruct, and to enlighten. In addition to the intrinsic value of the tales taken individually, the tales in their telling reveal much about the tellers. The pitting of tales one against another provides

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