Free Close Examination Essays and Papers

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    the character. So it follows that in Oedipus the King, a Greek tragedy, the tragic hero Oedipus should have some sort of flaw. However, after close examination of the text, no distinguishable "flaw" is revealed. Although Oedipus appears to have many "flaws" on the surface, namely his poor temperament, carelessness, curiosity and pride, close examination of the text reveals that he has many seemingly flawed characteristics that are not only justifiable but in some cases to be expected. One might

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    Streetcar Named Desire

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    Named Desire wrote, “The authors perceptions remain subtle and delicate… The final impression left is, surprisingly enough not of sensationalism but of subtlety” (38.) As in many of Williams's plays deeper meanings are understood only through close examination of each scene. The reader must ask him or herself as they go whether or not something might lend more than what lies on the surface. The tone is set immediately in scene one when Blanche begins by telling Eunice, “They told me to take a street-car

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    Comparing and contrasting Jewett's Sylvy in "A White Heron" with May Bartram of James's "The Beast in the Jungle" proves to be an interesting task. How can two such unlike characters be so alike. Only on close examination do these common threads appear. In the story "A White Heron," Sylvy is presented as a young, pre- adolescent girl, living in the country with her grand mother. They are very isolated to themselves, living fairly simple and frugal lives. Sylvy has a few mundane responsibilities

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    The Power of Photography

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    The Power of Photography I have never looked at anything as intensely as I have through the viewfinder of a camera. It may seem odd that my most intense experiences of reality have come through an artificial lens, but a camera is a close cousin to both a magnifying glass and a microscope. It is not only the ability to see things in more detail that commands our attention. It is something else, something about the art of photography that forces us to examine the world as we don’t normally do

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    Animal Farm provides an unusual outlook on the Russian Revolution and its leaders by using animals to represent their human counterparts. Orwell attacks communist society and points out weaknesses in its government officials. He calls for a close examination of the treatment of Russian citizens and questions whether they have any rights at all. Orwell was careful in his designation of animals in Animal Farm, especially in regards to the power reserved for the pigs. Animal Farm uses the perfect combination

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    Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” we see the main character as a rejected misfit in society.  He is often unaware of the world around him and reacts in what others would call a negative way to those situations he actually responds to.  However, close examination of the text used by James Thurber to portray him prompts a need to deconstruct the character Walter Mitty.  In doing so, we find that, far from being a misfit, he is actually the one member of society that is truly sound. To determine that

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    To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, may appear to be a simple story about childhood and life in a Southern town, but upon close examination it is a complex novel dealing with themes of education, moral courage, and tolerance. Through the eyes of Scout Finch, the young protagonist, novelist Harper Lee educates the reader about the importance of a moral education, as opposed to a formal education, the difference between traditional bravery and moral courage, and prejudice vs. tolerance. In the

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    Workplace Violence

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    escalate (Mattman, 1). Obviously something must be done to protect employees from workplace violence. Employees not only deserve a safe workplace environment but several state mandates need to be considered. Three important questions deserve close examination. These include, why over the past years have there been evidenced an increase in workplace violence? What are the effects on the business economics when they are subjected to occupational violence on the work site? And finally, what can be done

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    Children's Story Puss in Boots

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    Children's Story Puss in Boots A close examination of the tale type 545-b (according to Aarne and Thompson) (1) reveals a well known, almost universal tale of man and animal helper. There are many consistencies between western tradition and Central Asian renditions. Several themes are parallel yet cultural influences vary some of the plot details. The political and social structures of the time in which these stories were told shape these details and lays the background for the story. The most

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    Fort Pillow Attack

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    when General Nathan Bedford Forrest captured the fort with his 1,500 troops and claimed numerous Union lives in the process (Wyeth 250). It became an issue of propaganda for the Union, and as a result the facts were grossly distorted. After close examination it is clear that the ³Fort Pillow Massacre² (as it became known by abolitionists) was nothing of the sort. The 1,500 troops under the command of General Nathan Bedford Forrest acted as men and as soldiers in their capture of Fort Pillow.

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