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    of Human Rights (UDHR), the discourse of international human rights and its importance has increasingly become indoctrinated in the international community. In the context of political and economic development, there have been debates on how and which rights should be ordered and protected throughout different cultures and communities. Though there is a general acceptance of international human rights around the globe, there is an approach that divides them into civil and political rights and social

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    Civil and political rights are a class of rights that protect individuals' freedom from infringement by governments, social organizations and private individuals, and which ensure one's ability to participate in the civil and political life of the society and state without discrimination or repression. Civil rights include the ensuring of peoples' physical and mental integrity, life and safety; protection from discrimination on grounds such as race, gender, national origin, colour, sexual orientation

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    passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a groundbreaking law condemning segregation, was not devoid of personal motives. The Black community was not oblivious to this fact, and voiced its outrage through different mediums. Within the literary community, James Baldwin stands out as an author who especially attacked the government, claiming all the benefits his community was now receiving was not the result of compassion, but rather was the result of politics as usual. The Civil Rights Act of 1964

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    In a seminal essay entitled Citizenship and Social Class, T.H. Marshall proposes a three folded understanding of citizenship composed by civil, political and social rights. Marshall presents his argument through a synthesis of England history, showing how specific circumstances moulded a progressive and sequenced consolidation of citizenship. The expansion of capitalism during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries elicited the universalization of freedom as a vehicle to spread a “single uniform

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    1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson addressed a session of Congress to urge the passage of new voting rights legislation. President Johnson’s speech was in response to the unjustly attack of African Americans preparing to march in Montgomery. In his address Johnson confronted the problem of racism and racial discrimination. He declared that “every American citizen must have an equal right to vote. In order for Johnson to handle the American crisis and simultaneously settle into his new

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    The plight of the civil rights movement stands as one of the most influential and crucial elements to African-American history. We can accredit many activist, public speakers, and civil rights groups, to the equality and civil rights that African-American men and women are able to have in this country today. We see repeated evidence of these historical movements describes in fiction, plays, TV, and many other forms of media and literature. An artistic license is provided to many authors developing

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    group with which the Black Lives Matter movement has competing interests. In Los Angeles there exists an ideological opposition to the local Black Lives Matter movement that takes the form of older deeply religious African-Americans who prefer a more civil, community organizing approach based out of their church congregations (Friedersdorf:2015). While they are in agreement that the LAPD kills too many people each year they are still in competition for influence on local politics (Friedersdorf:2015)

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    Access of Inheritance

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    paternal right was passed on to the child through paternal authority. Hence, the child, 'alone could punish him in his family' (pg. 41) and the child attaining the right naturally through his fathers' authority and the government. Nevertheless, the foundation of hereditary along with the constitution ultimately permits the father to have a form of authority that is political and is constructive; seeing that the idea of imposing limitations allows an individual to attain protection of rights particularly

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    Civil liberties are a negative impression of individual liberty, guaranteeing basic rights and freedoms to Americans by restricting the government’s power, which are identified in the Bill of Rights and in the Constitution. Such as, guaranteeing citizens the right to practice their choice of religion, which is discussed in the First Amendment of the Bill of rights. By guaranteeing American citizens this freedom, it gives the individuals liberty from the government’s actions, by preventing government

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    or purpose for which the state or commonwealth is formed is making secure to the citizens the natural right to life, liberty and property which they had in the state of nature. In this state of nature, according to Locke, men were born free and equal: free to do what they wished without being required to seek permission from any other man, and equal in the sense of there being no natural political authority of one man over another. He quickly points out, however, that "although it is a state of liberty

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