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    of returning the companies to financial viability. In fact, close to 700 companies, which also included companies in the banking sector, were bailed out by the government and the total amount of taxpayers’ money that is supposed to be spent on the bailouts is about $12.5 trillion (New York Times, 2011). So far, the U.S Treasury has spent at least $2.5 trillion (2011). In exchange, the government became the owner of significant shares in these companies. However, this move by the U.S government has

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    An Analysis of the 2009 Auto Bailout

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    the U.S. Government handed them an initial bailout package worth $25 billion to rescue them from bankruptcy (Isidore). Through an analysis of the ethics behind government bailouts and an evaluation of arguments for and against the decision to give out such a package to the auto firms, I shall argue in this paper that, given the circumstances in which the decision had to be hastily made, it was morally justified for the U.S. government to reward the bailout package to the Big Three. These circumstances

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    Jake Clawson Ethical Communication Assignment 2/13/2014 JPMorgan Chase, Bailouts, and Ethics “Too big to fail” is a theory that suggests some financial institutions are so large and so powerful that their failure would be disastrous to the local and global economy, and therefore must be assisted by the government when struggles arise. Supporters of this idea argue that there are some institutions are so important that they should be the recipients of beneficial financial and economic policies from

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    Government Bailout for Corporate Failures

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    periodical concern that occurs to banks, industrial companies and other organizations. Gup begins his article by reviewing the history and importance of government bailouts for corporate failures. In his article on “What Does Too Big to Fail Mean?” he uses rhetoric questions in order to engage the readers in his analysis of government bailouts. For instance, he poses the question, “what should governments and government regulators do about it?” (Gup, 2003, p. 29). ‘It’ in this case referred to the periodical

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    It is necessary to pass the bailout plan in order to help and stimulate the economy. Not only will it have an impact on the American economy but on global markets as well. Instead of focusing on bailing out failed companies, the plan should center more on homeowners and help them to pay off their debts. By doing this, the bill would help homeowners as well as companies who are in possession of these kinds of troubled assets. Politicians should be less focused on their reelection and more focused

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    Was the Fed-Organized Bailout of LTCM Favorable? In September 1998, the Federal Reserve of New York intervened to rescue Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM), a very prominent hedge fund on the brink of collapse. The Fed followed this course of action because it wanted to prevent any dire consequences that would affect world financial markets should the hedge fund be allowed to fail. The incident induced an open-ended extension of the Fed’s responsibilities without congressional authorization

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    The American auto industry is in a crisis, their vehicles are not in demand and they need government bailouts to keep their businesses afloat. American vehicles are not on demand because people want fuel-efficient, the car companies that are not at the point of bankruptcy, longer lasting vehicles, and hybrid cars. The American car companies are at a point of bankruptcy and people don’t want to buy cars from a company that may not be there in a couple of months. The foreign car companies are doing

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    In 1759, Adam Smith created the term “invisible hand” to describe how the self-interested behavior of people in a highly competitive market system can lead to the greater good for everyone involved. Businesses like to create new and improved products in order to increase their profits and become more successful. When they create new products, they also increase society’s well-being, and quality of life. Due to the companies’ self-interest, they use the least expensive resources to produce their new

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    Collapse of RBS

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    “What goes up, must come down” – Isaac Einstein RBS did indeed go up, in fact, saying that it went to the top of the food chain won’t be an understatement. But it also came down, crashing. RBS was a market leader. The best at what they did. The best at acquisitions. And this is also what left them nowhere to go when credit crunch took centre stage. The acquisitions made life unbearable and walls started to close in on RBS. The acquisitions had left them stretched – 26 companies in the space of six

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    The economic system that we know as capitalism has proven to be in some shape or form broken. This system brings out the greed within human beings and this ideology of "Too Big To Fail" is an example of just that. To elaborate, our economic system of capitalism is arguably broken due to the fact that private corporations could become extremely wealthy and have more money and power than they know what do with; some corporations are able to do what they want without anyone raising a question. In addition

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