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    The Attachment theory is the both the work of John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth. Stresses the significance of "Attachment" as to self-improvement. In other words, attachment is a biological and evolutionary system that forms close bonds between the child and caregiver, particularly during times of stress or threat, that helps increase the odds of survival by ensuring parental caregiving and protection. Within the attachment behavioral system, Bowlby theorized that there are four phases of development

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    Attachment Theory

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    Attachment theory has had some very powerful theorists that have come up with these ideologies. In 1969, John Bowlby was the first theorist to develop the attachment theory. It is a theory developed to explain the emotional ties that children had with their parents or caregivers. It was believed that a child’s attachment style with a caregiver was developed throughout childhood and influenced how an individual interacts with society. It also gave an indication on what their parenting styles might

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    The Attachment Theory

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    The Attachment Theory The attachment theory talks about the early significance and developments of attachment between infants and their mothers. Attachment can be defined as intense, emotional ties to specific people. The attachment process can be divided into pre-attachment, discriminate and indiscriminate and multiple attachment phases. The development of specific attachment is shown through separation anxiety. The most influential versions of this approach was probably that of

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    Theories Of Attachment

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    Parental behavior is part of a larger conceptual framework called attachment behavior . This serves to protect and nourish offspring until they can function independently. Attachment and separation are critical factors in the study of developmental psychology and psychodynamic theory. Failure to develop emotional attachment may have significant and irreversible mental health consequences. Primate attachment or bonding is solidified by social behavior such as grooming and close physical proximity

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    Attachment Theory’s Main Concepts and Principles Attachment is described as the close emotional bond between two people and Attachment Theory (AT) generally concentrates on the early bonds in a person’s development as well as the effects that these bonds have on later socio-emotional development. While emphasis on attachment as an antecedent for future behavior and personality has decreased somewhat in recent years, it is interesting to note that the DSM IV-TR includes a “reactive attachment disorder”

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    The Attachment Theory

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    The Attachment theory is a psychological, ethological and evolutionary theory that gives a descriptive and explanatory framework of understanding interpersonal relationship between human beings. Presented by John Bowlby, the important tenet of this theory is that an infant needs to develop a relationship with at least one primary caregiver for social and emotional development to progress generally. The idea of attachment theory is that infants become attached to adults who are sensitive and responsive

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    Attachment Theory

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    leave for work? Well don’t worry that’s normal because you have made an attachment to your parents. When something goes wrong your parents are your safe haven, you rely on them to keep you from being harmed. We are brought up that our parents are the ones we must rely on for our needs until we are at least eighteen. A man named John Bowlby proposed that we are born with the need to attach to someone and that if the attachment is disturbed then it will cause irreversible damage to a child. John Bowlby

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    Attachment Theories In reactive attachment disorder (RAD), normal healthy bonds between parent or caregivers and the infant are established or are broken (Bower & Atkins, 2012). Normally, by the eighth month of life, infants form emotional attachments to parents or caregivers: basic needs of affection, comfort, and nurturing are formed (Bower & Atkins, 2012; Davis & Palladino, 2004). There are many theories that serve to explain how healthy attachments are formed. However, this paper only considered

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    Attachment Theory

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    facility? Attachment in infants is common and normal, but as the child begins to grow, things should slowly begin to change. Attachment is an emotional tie to specific people that mainly begins with the infant’s parents, and/or primary caregiver (Ainsworth, 1973). In today’s time, there are many different people who become the primary caregiver, including, fathers, grandparents, siblings, daycare/childcare providers, however, during the mid-1900’s, researchers focused on the attachment between

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    Introduction John Bowlby developed his Attachment Theory to examine and explore the contextual relationships between a child and their caregiver and their behavioral repercussions. He describes it is “a way of conceptualizing the propensity of human beings to make strong affectional bonds to particular others and of explaining the many forms of emotional distress and personality disturbance, including anxiety, anger, depression, and emotional detachment, to which unwilling separation and loss

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