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    William B. Willcox's The Age of Aristocracy

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    William B. Willcox's The Age of Aristocracy This compact little book is Volume III of a series entitled A History of England, edited by Lacey Baldwin Smith, and its inclusion in this series reveals much about its scope and intent. Smith writes in the Preface to the series that "their authors have tried by artistry to step beyond the usual confines of a textbook and conjure up something of the drama of politics, of the wealth of personalities, and even of the pettiness, as well as the greatness

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    Aristocracy

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    The new aristocracy was made up for the most part of bureaucrats, scientists… and professional politicians. These people, whose origins lay in the salaried middle class… had been shaped and brought together by the barren world of monopoly industry and centralized government. (Orwell, 281) Aristocracy, the rule of a few well suited individuals, is a historically important and controversial form of government. As a sort of middle ground between monarchy and democracy, aristocracy is a very unique way

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    Decaying Aristocracy

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    its ancestors” (Hawthorne 155) explains Holgrave about the aristocratic roots of the Pyncheon family in The House of the Seven Gables. In this novel, Nathaniel Hawthorne creates a story that effectively describes the clash between the decaying aristocracy and the emerging laboring class in the nineteenth-century in America through its characters. This “gothic romance” tells the story of an aristocratic Pyncheon family that once was wealthy, but now encounters itself with poverty and scarcity to the

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    weighs which regime is the best. At the end of this long thought out discussion it seems plausible that Aristotle comes to the conclusion that Aristocracy would logically be the most just regime. In that bold claim he is not taking credit from any of the other regimes, because he believes that all regimes are just if they serve the common advantage; Aristocracy would just be the most just. A regime is defined

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    Democracy

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    Democracy This essay will now discuss the different forms of government, which are monarchy and aristocracy. In this essay I will also answer the question “Is Democracy the Best Form of Government?” My basic answer to that question is yes, I do think it is the best form of governments. I will be giving reason to back up my answer to this question. This essay will now discuss the different forms of government and the answer to the question “is Democracy the Best Form of Government?” in more depth

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    on their values of utility and social responsibility, and abandoning an idle aristocracy in decline. In Persuasion, the only novel of Austen's that does not center around a landed estate, the letting of Kellynch Hall shows an aristocracy ousted from its familial seats of power, in favor of the fashionable world of Bath. Landed responsibility is given up for a hollow world of rented rooms and social display. The aristocracy is replaced in their hallowed hall by members of the new meritocracy, the Admiral

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    every characteristic of a person belonging to the upper class. Chaucer's hidden meanings and ideas make us think that the story is about roosters and farm animals, but in reality he is making the Aristocracy of his time period the subject of his mockery by making the reader realize how clueless the Aristocracy can be to the way things are in the real World. Chaucer describes Chaunticleer in many different ways. One of them is his language. Chaunticleer's language is that of a scholar. He quotes many

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    advances the plot, emphasizes the theme of social expectations, and provides a satirical image of the aristocracy. The character of Lady Catherine de Bourgh is an integral element of the plot, contributing to, as well as influencing, the final outcome of Darcy's marriage and the various factors associated with it. Lady Catherine, a prominent and influential noblewomen in the English aristocracy, thrusts her domineering predilections onto her family, friends, and acquaintances, starting with the

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    social class most distinct from the rest, remains one of the most influential economic leaders throughout Europe during the Age of Discovery. Exploration and newfound wealth drove this class into being so powerful that their presence threatened the Aristocracy and social strata. Let it be known that the drive behind the bourgeoisie was not centered as much on religion as it was on money and power. The real reasons for discovery as we are told, "Gold, God and Glory," remain somewhat true. In the case of

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    the world, The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere The ceremony of innocence is drowned. The poem metaphorically suggests the theme of the tendency toward violence and oppression in revolutionaries after being so wrongfully treated by the aristocracy. Dickens supports this theme by finding immense fault in the social structure of society, the judicial system during that time period, and the lunacy of the revolution. Throughout the novel, Dickens approaches the revolution with ambivalence. He

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