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    Argument

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    Argument I enjoyed writing this paper because I love to ski. This article and the next one are important to me because safety when I am skiing is a big deal. I discussed the validity of ski helmets on the market today in respect to the test Consumer Reports put out last ski season. I just wrote for this one and went back and edited it later on. I went to a few different sites to find information to use in this paper along with the information that was provided in the article. About 23,000

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    Arguments

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    then it is an argument. Winning those arguments, whether you know or do not know what you are talking about, is a great feeling. Here is how to win arguments, when you have no clue of what the argument entails, by making things up, using meaningless but weighty-sounding words and phrases, and by using snappy comebacks. Making things up is harder than it seems. Made up phrases just cant be off the top of your head, they have to be thought out. Suppose, in a Peruvian economy argument, you are trying

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    Argument in the Apology

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    The main argument in The Apology by famous ancient Greek philosopher Plato is whether, notorious speaker and philosopher Socrates is corrupting the youth by preaching ungodly theories and teaching them unlawful ideas that do harm to individuals and society. In his words Socrates quoted the prosecution’s accusation against him: “Socrates is guilty of corrupting the minds of the young, and of believing in supernatural things of his own invention instead of the gods recognized by the state.” 1 Further

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    Divisibility Argument

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    DIVISIBILITY ARGUMENT This paper will discuss the dualism’s Divisibility Argument. This argument relies on Leibniz’s Law and uses a different property to prove the distinctness of brain states of mental states. Mary, who is a materialist, presents several objections to that argument. Her main objection corresponds to the first/third-person approach. She believes that Dave presents that argument only from the first-person approach, which is introspection, and totally disregards the third-person approach

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    The Argument of Dualism

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    Arguments of Dualism Dualism is the theory that mind and matter are two distinct things. The main argument for dualism is that facts about the objective external world of particles and fields of force, as revealed by modern physical science, are not facts about how things appear from any particular point of view, whereas facts about subjective experience are precisely about how things are from the point of view of individual conscious subjects. They have to be described in the first person as

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    The Ontological Argument

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    The Ontological Argument The Ontological Argument, put forth by Saint Anselm in his Proslogium, attempts to prove the existence of God simply by the fact that we have a particular concept of God - that God is "that than which nothing greater can be conceived." Saint Anselm presents a convincing argument that many people view as the work of a genius. It is also quite often considered a failure because, in William L. Rowe's words, "In granting that Anselm's God is a possible thing we are in fact

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    An Arrogant Argument

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    not only assumes that Aryans are superior to all other races but that the German people believe this as well. He assumes that that the question of race superiority has already been answered. According to Annette T. Rottenberg’s The Structure of Argument, “if [a] writer makes a statement that assumes that the very question being argued has already been proved, [that] writer is guilty of begging the question” (291). Hitler proudly states, “All the human culture, all the results of art, science, and

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    An Argument for Vegetarianism

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    An Argument for Vegetarianism ABSTRACT: In this paper I propose to answer the age-old reductio against vegetarianism, which is usually presented in the form of a sarcastic question ( e.g., "How do you justify killing and eating plants?"). Addressing the question takes on special significance in the light of arguments which seem to show that even nonsentient life is intrinsically valuable. Thus, I suggest that we rephrase the question in the following manner: When beings (who are biological and

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    Argument in an Essay

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    Argument can be defined as claim or thesis statement. The aim of an argument is to convince audience. It is essential to make sound argument so that audience could engage in and align with the author’s view. Therefore, one of the key elements could be identified as the awareness of audience. Another key element is evidence. In order to persuade audience, argument should be consolidated through evidence and authority. The credibility of author and argument could be enhanced by means of using evidence

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    Constitutional Arguments

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    Government Paper One When the Constitution was written two factions developed during the ratification process. The Federalist's were staunch supporters of the Constitution as it was. The Anti-federalists wanted the Constitution to contain stronger restrictions on the National government and wanted a Bill of Rights added. In thinking about this paper I tried to decided what I side I would have fallen on during the Constitution debates. After some thought, I came to the conclusion that I would have

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