Free Aphra Behn Essays and Papers

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Free Aphra Behn Essays and Papers

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    Essay #1 In life and in literature, love and passion often drive a man to succeed. The drive was often led by a passionate cause, such as a woman. With this passion, a man could defy all obstacles and continue to survive based on hope. In Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, this was no different. Oroonoko’s motivation to thrive on and survive was his love and enthusiasm for Imoinda. The main test of his endurance was when Oroonoko lost his wife to the king, and he became a slave. Oroonoko was a slave trader

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    in their way: the grandfather of Oroonoko. Imoinda was very beautiful that even the whites liked her for her looks. She was explained to not be like the other slaves. She was so beautiful in fact that Oroonoko’s grandfather wanted her for himself (Behn). This was one of the few ethical dilemmas that she faced. Stay with Oroonoko or give in to the grandfather so they wouldn’t hurt Oroonoko. She also had to choose whether to resist the slaveowners or not. If she would resist

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    18th century, a crop of courageous women began publishing their works, beginning the literary feminist movement. Together, Aphra Behn, Charlotte Smith, Fanny Burney, and Mary Wollstonecraft challenge the status quo of what it means to be a

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    relationship termed a friendship. A relationship where an individual contains more power over another and asserts this power cannot be defined a friendship regardless of how kind each individual is to the other. Through the account of an unnamed female, Aphra Behn outlines such a relationship within the narrative of Oroonoko and his encounters with other characters as a royal slave. One character in particular, Mr. Trefry, a plantation supervisor, takes a keen liking to Oroonoko and holds him up on a pedestal

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    Traveling Experiences While reading both stories of travel and misfortune for these characters several points came to my mind, wondering if other readers might have thought as well as me. Aphra Behn in Oronooko presents the reader with a story of disgrace, but at the same time full of love. She also lets the reader see a little farther because she gives a lot of description on the characters and the places trying to place the reader in the correct mood and spot as she wanted. Oronooko lives a

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    Aphra Behn's Oroonoko details the story of a noble African prince's enslavement, and it has often been cited as a major antislavery work. Throughout the text, Behn seemingly possesses a conflicting attitude towards the attitude toward slavery and racism in general. On one hand, her portrayal of the protagonist Oroonko is noble, dignified, and sympathetic, and she frequently disparages European culture and religion while depicting Europeans themselves in an unfavorable way; however, Behn reveals deep

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    The History of Feminine Fiction:Exploring Laura Runge’s Article, Gendered Strategies in the Criticism of Early Fiction Laura Runge is an assistant professor of English at the University of South Florida. In her article, "Gendered Strategies in the Criticism of Early Fiction," Runge argues that, during the eighteenth century, the overdetermined gendered association between the female reader and the female writer excluded the female novelist from literary excellence and ultimately led to the inferior

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    "education" to the males. Similarly, the white Surinam community expects Oroonoko to fit its opinions about blackness and savagery of a slave. Aphra Behn´s Oroonoko was written in 1688, at a period when to express the views on an african american slave openly and passionately, was unsuited for a person, let alone a woman, to do. Throughout the story Behn is also taking a stand for women's freedom of writing. Not only is she presenting facts ba... ... middle of paper ... ...rder. The plots

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    Obeyed Wifehood and Conceiving Womanhood in Othello and Oroonoko Many readers feel the tendency to compare Aphra Behn's Oroonoko to William Shakespeare's Othello. Indeed they have many features in common, such as wives executed by husbands, conflicts between white and black characters, deceived heroes, the absolute vulnerability of women, etc. Both works stage male characters at both ends of their conflicts. In Othello, the tragic hero is Othello, and the villain is Iago. In Oroonoko, the hero is

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    The Restoration Period, lasting from roughly 1660 until 1710, was a time of renewed interest in the theatre due to European monarch Charles II’s revival of the theatrical scene in England, Scotland and Ireland. While the Restoration Period is a broad term coined for the renewal of the English monarchies and leaders in these areas, Restoration theatre, and more specifically a comedic style of theatre that came to prominence with explicit content known as Restoration Comedy, were important aspects

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