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    American Indian Movement

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    Government Versus AIM For the past 50 years, the United States Government has been conducting disinformation campaigns against minority groups such as the Black Panther Party, Black Liberation Army and the Palestine Solidarity Committee. The American Indian Movement (AIM) was not an exception. Propaganda was only one of the many tactics adopted by the government that AIM encountered. Others include assassinations, unprovoked armed confrontations and "fabrication of evidence in criminal cases" (Churchill

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    The American Indian Movement

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    The American Indian Movement is an organization in the United States that attempts to bring attention to the injustice and unfair treatment of American Indians. Aside from that, the AIM works for better protection and care for the American Indians and their families. They have been changing the American perception of Indians since the late 1960’s, as well as aiding our awareness of their existence. The AIM was founded in Minneapolis, Minnesota by Dennis Banks and Clyde Bellecourt, mainly to stop

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    American Indians once lived a prosperous and full life, relying on the bounty of land and nature. Colonization by white settlers disrupted this peaceful existence, uprooting tribes from their land and forcing them to assimilate to new cultural and religion views. Years of mistreatment and abuse led to the organization of the American Indian Movement to fight for their rights and liberty. Through the AIM, Indians attempted to gain recognition and spread knowledge of their culture and heritage to

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    American Indian Movement: Activism and Repression Native Americans have felt distress from societal and governmental interactions for hundreds of years. American Indian protests against these pressures date back to the colonial period. Broken treaties, removal policies, acculturation, and assimilation have scarred the indigenous societies of the United States. These policies and the continued oppression of the native communities produced an atmosphere of heightened tension. Governmental pressure

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    The American Indian Movement shows similar issues compared to the Standing Bear Trial, but in a different time period. The Standing Bear Trial began on May1, 1879 and ended the 12th, as the Movement began in 1968. The purpose of the Trial and Movement had similarities. The Trial and Movement went along separate paths but had similarities. The Trial and Movement outcomes were separate but had similarities. Chief Standing Bear and the Ponca tribe were forcefully removed from their homeland in Nebraska

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    American Indian Political Activism

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    American Indian political activism played a tremendous role throughout history, which has laid the foundation for how Indians are being treated with more respect in today’s society. In 1961, about the same time as the meeting in Chicago, the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC) was founded (Hudson). The goal of the NIYC was to protest against civil disobedience and to bring awareness to Indian heritage (Document of Indian Militancy, pg. 527). To promote the NIYC, young Indians would speak at colleges

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    Like a Hurricane Book Review

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    In Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee two American Indians from separate tribes join together to co-author this historically thought provoking portrayal of a time in history when playing by the rules did not work when dealing with minority rights issues. Paul Chaat Smith, a Comanche and Robert Allen Warrior an Osage join forces to create an accurate account of a time when the Native American civil rights movement took center stage television and press coverage. The

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    Native Americans' Civil Rights Struggle

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    The Native Americans have come across long journey of difficult times since the occupation of their land by European settlers. There are still two sides of a coin- a world of civilization and a world of underdeveloped society in this one country- USA. The paradox is that the constitution which seems to be a model of democracy to many nations of the world lacks a lot for not acting accordingly. Those organized and unorganized struggles of Native Americans were challenged by the heavily armed white

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    “Society of broken promise, economies war citizens whores, political pimps leaving us flat on our backs, creating today waiting for the promise land” (Trudell). The U.S government intends on taking what they want from the Indians with resistance. John Trudell, who was a Native American wanted his voice heard. He spent a decade moralizing to stand up to politicians and to appeal the reason for why he did not trust nor approve of the political system. “The government has been literally the most bloodthirsty

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    The Dynamics of U.S. “Indian Policy”: 1830-Today U.S. Indian Policy after 1830 is characterized by the strengthening of governmental paternalism primarily demonstrated by U.S. ideals of expansion and prosperity, and is only checked within the explosive political era of the American Indian movement. As a national ideology that still endures in some states to this day, paternalism assumes that native peoples are uncivilized, backward, and in need of foreign leadership and guidance. Often termed

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