Free American Epidemic Essays and Papers

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Free American Epidemic Essays and Papers

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    An American Epidemic

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    An American Epidemic In modern times, nobody who reads the newspapers or watches television can avoid the chilling fate that our country faces. School violence is a rapidly growing trend in America, and it seems to be there is nothing we can do to stop it. The offenders are from all races and social classes. They range from the high school hero to the high school dropout. It often seems the only thing they have in common is an utter disregard for their own life and the lives of others. In the following

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    Affluenza: An American Epidemic

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    Affluenza is an epidemic which effects millions of people in the United States. “Until this century [20th], to consume was considered a bad thing” says Jeremy Rifkin an expert on affluenza ( Gross ). The victims of affluenza are consumers who work long hours at a job they hate so they can buy things which they don’t need ( Fight Club ). Like AIDS, affluenza has spread quickly throughout the United States showing no prejudice of race, sex or color. However, unlike AIDS, affluenza is

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    Diabetes an Epidemic in the African American Community "The facts are clear: The diabetes epidemic sweeping the U.S. is hitting the African American community particularly hard, according to doctors." (2) Diabetes is defined as, "A disease that affects the body's ability to produce or respond to insulin, a hormone that allows blood glucose (blood sugar) to enter the cells of the body and be used for energy." (1) There are two types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes

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    initial cases of AIDS, though this of course has never been proven to be accurate. Since the turn of the century, the overall health of all Americans has improved substantially. Although advances in medical and scientific technology have improved the health status of the American people, there is a growing concern and recognition that African-Americans have not benefited equally from the fruits of science. Whereas these facts are not "new news," it is apparent that most of the public and the scientific

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    American History X and the Epidemic of Youth Violence Amazing grace, how sweet the sound, That saved a wretch like me. I once was lost, But now am found, Was blind but now I see. --Shaker hymn James Garbarino (1999) discusses the boys who are lost and ways that they can learn to see again in his book Lost Boys: Why Our Sons Turn Violent and How We Can Save Them. He takes an in depth look at what he calls the "epidemic of youth violence" in America in order to determine its causes and origins

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    people of Native American origin. Food, language, and traditions are three big components that define the Native American culture, but could alterations to the very components that define these indigenous people also be contributing to their demise? Many factors have contributed to the declining health of Native Americans, but most notably, changes in eating habits and inactive lifestyles are the two of the main culprits leading to the high diabetes rates among the Native American population. According

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    The epidemic of HIV/AIDS has been a repeat offender in the deaths of many people worldwide, African Americans, specifically, have been disproportionately impacted by this virus since it was first discovered in the early 1980s. Despite African Americans only being accountable for a small portion of the total U.S. population, they are the ethnic group most greatly affected by this virus. The HIV and AIDS epidemic does not simply target African American males, but over the years has grown to greatly

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    The American Obesity Epidemic

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    Why are Americans getting bigger by the day? And what's so bad about that anyway? Studies have shown that there are many negative effects associated with obesity. Obesity has been accused of contributing to many long-term conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, diabetes and cancer (Pennybacker 15). Along with the fact that obesity is the most common form of malnutrition in the Western world, it also affects sixty-four percent of Americans (Pennybacker

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    Obesity: An American Epidemic

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    Weight control is one of the most challenging problems facing American society. Obesity rates climb higher and higher while arguments about the reasons for this disaster seem circular. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines obesity as, “a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater” (U.S. Obesity Trends). The figures are shocking: as Alan Greenblatt reports, “nearly two out of three Americans are overweight or obese, and the number of overweight adolescents has tripled over the last 20

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    Pornography -- An Epidemic? The subtopic being examined in this segment of pornography as a whole, is that of violent pornography. In order to understand what is going to be discussed and the examples that will be cited, one must understand the context of violent pornography in relation to Pornography as a whole. But as this section will conclude, it is actually the widespread viewing of pornography as represented through the media, which leads to violent actions. To begin with, the words violence

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