Free Ambivalence Essays and Papers

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    Hester's Ambivalence in The Scarlet Letter Throughout Nathaniel Hawthorne's book The Scarlet Letter, Hester's attitudes toward her adultery are ambivalent.  This ambivalence is shown by breaking the book into three different parts.  In each part her attitudes change significantly. Hester starts by seeing her act as a sin that she is sorry for committing.  She changes and no longer feels sorry for the sin.  Finally, Hester sees the act as not sinful, but she regrets committing

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    Icons of Ambivalence in Bless Me Ultima

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    Icons of Ambivalence in Bless Me Ultima The portrait of Mexican Americans is layered in shades of ambivalence. Aside from the fact there is evidence that they can not really be classified as a migratory culture in that the land where they tend to migrate once belonged to Mexico, they can also lay an earlier claim to the land as Native Americans. The Spanish Europeans who settled in the area that became Mexico evolved as the dominant culture over the oral culture of the Native Americans. Nevertheless

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    Voice and Ambivalence in Bless Me Ultima and Baby of the Family Bless Me Ultima and Baby of the Family serve as the 'coming of age' stories of two minority children. Rudolfo Anaya and Tina McElory Ansa skillfully reveal the richness, diversity, and conflicts that can exist within the Hispanic-American and African-American cultures primarily through the dream sequences in each novel. Dreams are the mechanism used in each work to magnify the individual experiences and conflicts Tony and Lena encounter

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    is summarised in the Boyne and Rattansi (1990) quote; postmodernists on the other hand do not seek to fully understand society with one direct answer and methodology but attempt to question what is happening in society with reflexivity and ambivalence; understanding how relativism shapes all sociological thought. Hassard and Parker (1993) illustrate this point with the imagery of strong ‘philosophical pillars’ being brought down to be questioned, re-examined and perhaps even destroyed with

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    Djuna Barnes's The Diary of a Dangerous Child

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    into this figure in Barnes's early works. In its mixture of the domestic (baby/child/adolescent) and the sensual (vampire) and the dangerous appeal that fusion entails, the child vampire in Barnes's writings and illustrations symbolizes the ambivalence that American society of the Modernist period had about newly acquired freedoms for women. This paper explores a kind of perilous yet unwavering attraction that the child vampire epitomizes. In pursuing a contextual, interpretive framework that

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    Post-Modern Art and Obscenity

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    swirling, sequined green and blue patterns and one exposed breast composed of dried elephant dung. Cutouts of photographs of women's buttocks and genitals dot the background of the canvas. The disturbing elements of this piece are all based in ambivalence-the audience is not sure how to react. To begin with, the multiplicity of media, some of them quite unusual-sequins, oil, collage, and elephant dung-makes the piece a bit different from "traditional" visual works and thwarts our desire to categorize

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    Society defines the essence of masculinity in part through sport. Athletics encourage or reinforce the courageous, strong, superior, and competitive male sex role (Messner, 20). Boys grow up being judged by their ability, inability, interest in, or ambivalence toward sport. They equate their successes and failures with self-worth, sometimes producing a self-image wherein they value themselves more or less depending on these achievements (Messner, 24). Young boys can learn priceless lessons and acquire

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    identify her with, and distance her from, each side of her ancestry. Helga's identity becomes taboo because it leads her "diverging in two contrary directions"(Freud 24) that cannot exist simultaneously. Freud's article on "Taboo and Emotional Ambivalence" follows these two separate directions that divide the meaning of 'taboo' to find that at the end they merge to repel him in their "sense of something unapproachable"(24). He defines taboo as, "on the one hand, 'sacred', 'consecrated', and on the

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    The invention of the Human

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    with Shakespeare. Bloom argues that Shakespeare so interpenetrates our consciousness and our cultural existence that we do not know the boundary between him and us. One suspects that we are receptive to Bloom’s idea because of the mysterious ambivalence of Shakespeare himself. Shakespeare’s elusive self, the stuff of Keats’s Negative Capability, may indeed be found in his 100 major characters and hundreds of minor personages dispersed through his histories, comedies, and tragedies. Bloom, however

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    this as adequate evidence of his guilt. However, certainly not everyone takes this direct an approach. James Oakes makes a good point in recognizing that guilt is not always starkly obvious. "Guilt is the product of a deeply rooted psychological ambivalence that impels the individual to behave in ways that violate fundamental norms even as they fulfill basic desires (Oakes 120)." In other words, guilt creates such inner turmoil that a guilty man will deviate from normal behavior. In this case, we will

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