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Free Altitude Essays and Papers

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    Altitude Safety

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    Changes in altitude have a profound effect on the human body. The body attempts to maintain a state of homeostasis or balance to ensure the optimal operating environment for its complex chemical systems. Any change from this homeostasis is a change away from the optimal operating environment. The body attempts to correct this imbalance. One such imbalance is the effect of increasing altitude on the body’s ability to provide adequate oxygen to be utilized in cellular respiration. With an increase

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    High Altitude Training

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    High Altitude Training For the first mile of my daily run the cows are with me. They seem out of place along this road that winds through mountain pines, but in Arizona cows are everywhere, even at 7,000 feet. They watch incredulously with soft eyes as I run by. They stand as still as statues and only their heads move, slowly and almost imperceptibly, like the heads in paintings of long-dead relatives that gaze right at you, no matter where you stand in the room. I can’t tell if they approve

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    of the High Altitude Sleeping System: HASS Abstract Various negative physiological effects of sleeping at high elevations increase dramatically above 12,000 feet. These effects include dehydration, hypothermia, susceptibility to respiratory tract infection, high altitude sleep apnea, severe fatigue, and other ailments of varying severity. Until now, technology has done very little to address these problems. Working in the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Biological Altitude Testing Laboratory

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    Human Variations in High Altitude Populations Thesis:The purpose of this paper is to describe the high altitude stresses and the general adaptations made by the Tibetan population in the Himalayas and the Quechua in the Andes. I Introduction II Background A Quechua People B Tibetan People III General Adaptations A Physical 1 Growth 2 Development 3 Core temperature 4 Extremity temperature B Non- Physical 1 Clothing 2 Houses 3 Schedule V Conclusion “Some ten to twenty-five

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    low-oxygen training or high altitude training before, but probably do not know all that much about. This type of training to have an advantage in competitions is very well known amongst endurance athletes, specifically runners. Training in low-oxygen situation for short term will reap benefits for almost any athlete. Training at high altitudes is rewarding for athletes because it forces your body to make changes that will result in positive gains. While training at high altitudes the lack of oxygen causes

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    High altitude cerebral edema and high altitude pulmonary edema are very real, very lethal sicknesses. They mainly occur with people that experience extreme changes in elevation, at a faster pace that their bodies can get accustomed to. People that are mainly at risk are those who climb mountains to higher elevations, generally above a mile above sea level, and also those who fly after diving at deep depths. These two sicknesses, while potentially lethal, can be easily mitigated with the correct precaution

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    Introduction to High Altitude Stress High altitude stress is a pathophysiological effect that occurs to 25-85% of humans7 who increase their altitude without acclimatization. Going from sea level to the top of Mount Everest yields a drastic drop in the partial pressure of oxygen as the pressure goes from 149mmHg at base camp to 43mmHg15 at the summit as seen in Figure 1. Focusing primarily on the renal and respiratory physiology, increasing elevation rapidly (thus experiencing hypoxia) can result

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    source: Air & Space/Smithsonian. The speed of sound varies with temperature. At sea level Mach 1 is around 742 mph. It decreases with altitude until it reaches about 661 mph at 36,000 feet, then remains at that speed in a band of steady temperature up to 60,000 feet. Because of the variation, it is possible for an airplane flying supersonic at high altitude to be slower than a subsonic flight at sea level.

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    surface blast, subsurface burst, and high altitude burst. An air burst occurs when a weapon is detonated at a height so the fireball does not reach the surface of the earth (Effects Nuclear Explosions). When the shock wave hits the ground, the first wave will "bounce" off to create a second wave. When the blast is higher off the ground, the initial shock wave will be weaker, but will effect a larger area (5.0 Effects Nuclear Weapons). By varying the altitude of the explosion, one can change the blast

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    an impact on local business. Aviation in regulated in many different ways nationwide. There are many regulations that are federal, such as airspace, and must be obeyed by everyone and there are regulations that are local, such as traffic pattern altitude, and must be obeyed as if they were federal regs. As in any other field of work there are laws and regulations people must obey by. If people were allowed to do what ever they want, then we would live in a world of chaos. There are many different

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