The Sixties : A Long March Essay

The Sixties : A Long March Essay

Length: 1094 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The Sixties: A Long March to Freedom is a documentary depicting the cruelty against African American in the 1960’s. It sheds light on the diverse campaigns carried out by civil rights organizations in cities such as Selma, Birmingham, Montgomery, but “the incubator of it all was Nashville, Tennessee.” (Douglas Brinkley) The documentary tries to give the viewer a glimpse into the life of those who went through the hard times during The Civil Rights Movement.
Many tend to intertwine race and racism and think of it as being the same thing, but they aren’t. Race refers to a person’s physical characteristics. Racism is “the belief that all members of each race possess characteristics or abilities specific to that race, especially so as to distinguish it as inferior or superior to another race or races.” (Google) In this documentary not only do they discuss race, but also many events throughout the Civil Rights Movement such as Martin Luther King, the Freedom Writers, the Freedom Rides, and many more.
In the South, black people couldn 't vote. Libraries, schools, and churches were segregated. The very first sit in was held in Nashville. The first signs of violence began shortly after. Eighty Nashville students out of over three hundred participating in the sit ins were arrested. Soon after, Nashville became the first place where blacks and whites ate together. There were sit ins in Atlanta where Martin Luther King gets arrested and kept in jail while everyone else gets released. Within 24 hours Robert Kennedy called a judge to have King released, which gave much leeway to Kennedy becoming president.
Not long after the Freedom Writer, the Freedom Rides came into play. It started off with two buses, thirteen people, going from Washingto...


... middle of paper ...


...rom being “pale” to “dark” with a vast variety in between, humans have set these divisions and then called them "real." These divisions are not real, hence, social construction.
This documentary had me realize that I was not fully aware of all the information on racism and what I thought I knew about race and racism was not completely accurate. While much progress has been made towards the design of racial equality in America there is still plenty of hard work to be done in educating children and showing them to support equality and racial tolerance. Those who surround these children on a daily basis are the ones who need to give the example so that they learn to follow as they grow older and do the same with their own children. By educating the young population at an adolescent age about the risks of stereotype we can diminish racism in future generations to come.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on The Sixties

- Hubert Humphrey once stated, “When we say, ‘One nation under God, with liberty and justice for all,’ we are talking about all people. We either ought to believe it or quit saying it” (Hakim 111). During the 1960’s, a great number of people did, in fact, begin to believe it. These years were a time of great change for America. The country was literally redefined as people from all walks of life fought to uphold their standards on what they believed a true democracy is made of; equal rights for all races, freedom of speech, and the right to stay out of wars in which they felt they didn’t belong....   [tags: 1960s Racism Vietnam American History Essays]

Strong Essays
3123 words (8.9 pages)

Essay on The Sixties: A Decade of Rebellion

- “Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans” (Kennedy 916). With these words, John F. Kennedy in his inaugural address in 1961 described the 1960’s decade. This era in American history encapsulated a belief in the power of young people to change the world, a desire to help others globally and accept their differences, and a war that would eventually destroy all that America stood for. It was a time for new ideas in all aspects of life....   [tags: U.S. History]

Strong Essays
1641 words (4.7 pages)

Music and the Sixties Essay

- Music and the Sixties What the music of the late 1960s and early 1970 are attempting to achieve is a protest to the U.S. government. From the lyrics of Neil Young's Ohio performed by Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, the vocalists are memorializing the incident that occurred during a protest about U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War in Kent State University where nine students were injured and four students were killed by the Ohio National Guardsmen who opened fire on unarmed students: Tin soldiers and Nixon's comin,' We're finally on our own, This summer I hear the drummin' Four dead in Ohio Got to get down to it....   [tags: Music Politics History Essays]

Strong Essays
921 words (2.6 pages)

A Summary of The Civil Rights Movement Essay

- A Summary of The Civil Rights Movement The civil rights movement saw one of it’s earliest achievements when The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) (founded in 1909), fought to end race separation in the case of Brown Vs. The Board of Education. The court thereby rejected the “separate but equal” doctrine and overturned the case of Plessy vs. Ferguson. Public schools were finally integrated in the Fall of 1955. In august of the same year Fourteen year old Emmett Till is kidnapped, beaten mercilessly, shot, and dumped in the Tallahatchie River for “whistling at a white woman”....   [tags: Events, Sixties, Discrimination]

Strong Essays
661 words (1.9 pages)

Performance and Permanence in Sixties Literature Essay

- Performance and Permanence in Sixties Literature         What is art. Any generation of artists defines itself by the way it answers this question. The artists of the 1960s found their answer in the idea of art as experience. Art was not something that happened; it was something that happened around you, with you, to you. In the moment of creation, and in that moment alone, there was art. For artists of the Sixties, art was vibrant and alive, and thus to say a product was finished was simply to say it was dead....   [tags: Sixties 60]

Strong Essays
1883 words (5.4 pages)

The Sixties, by Terry H. Anderson Essay

- The Sixties, by Terry H. Anderson, takes the reader on a journey through one of the most turbulent decades in American life. Beginning with the crew-cut conformity of 1950s Cold War culture and ending with the transition into the uneasy '70s, Anderson notes the rise of an idealistic generation of baby boomers, widespread social activism, and revolutionary counterculture. Anderson explores the rapidly shifting mood of the country with the optimism during the Kennedy years, the liberal advances of Johnson's "Great Society," and the growing conflict over Vietnam that nearly tore America apart....   [tags: Essays on The Sixties]

Strong Essays
1617 words (4.6 pages)

Erikson's Psychoanalytic Theory of Development: Jo March of Little Women

- According to Erikson's psychoanalytic theory of development, there are certain relationships that help us proceed through life and move though stages of development. At every at stage in his theory there is a fight, there is a balance that must be found to solve a crisis. If the crisis is resolved in each stage the individual will find a virtue. A good balance is made up of mostly the positive outcome but a healthy amount of the negative is necessary or else the individual will have too much a good thing, which Erikson calls a maladaptation....   [tags: Jo March, Argumentative]

Strong Essays
1136 words (3.2 pages)

The Sixties Essays

- 1960’s Term Paper The 1960’s impacted the United States in profound ways. With the seventy million baby boomers growing into their teens, they brought with them change that is still evolving in our society today. The sixties was a time where American culture moved from being conservative to new and insightful ways of thinking. With these changes, it brought a new counter culture that would be known as the hippie culture. The hippies led way into a new sexual revolution that would break the old fashioned boundaries....   [tags: U.S. History ]

Strong Essays
1038 words (3 pages)

The Turbulen Sixties Essay

- The Turbulent Sixties Throughout American history, each generation has sought to individualize itself from all others preceding it. Decades of American history can be separated to represent a distinctive set of values, culture, and political ideals. The 1960's was a decade caught between euphoric, idealistic beginnings and a discordant, violent climax. The music of this time period produced a strong counterculture which sought to influence America in a way never before experienced. The songs were the backbone of this new age; they were the tunes which the generation danced to, marched to, and got high off of....   [tags: essays research papers]

Strong Essays
1648 words (4.7 pages)

The Sixties Essay

- "The Sixties" Freedom has been discussed and debated for a while now and yet no one can completely agree that it exists. Since the Civil, War America has been conditioned to be divided politically. The conflict over the meaning of freedom continues to exist from the civil war, throughout the sixties and in the present. The Civil War was fought over the question of what freedom means in America. The issue was in the open for all to see: slavery. Human slavery was the shameless face of the idea of freedom....   [tags: American History]

Free Essays
1370 words (3.9 pages)