Essay about The 's Tale By Margaret Atwood And Never Let Me Go By Kazuo Ishiguro

Essay about The 's Tale By Margaret Atwood And Never Let Me Go By Kazuo Ishiguro

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A Warning: To Not Be A Robotic World
Humanity is defined by love, emotions, and sex. The society in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood really restricts women from the act of sex for pleasure/emotional connection. The society in Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro restricts intimacy, and while sex is allowed, it is frowned upon. The governments in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro both take advantage of women’s bodies and communicate negative feelings about sex. These books act as a warning against sex, emotion, and intimacy, becoming robotic in our world.
The society in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood hugely restricts the act of sex. In addition, Gilead restricts emotional intimacy. Women’s bodies are taken advantage of to the point that the women no longer see their bodies as their own. They are defined only by the way others in their society can make use of them. Offred, the protagonist of The Handmaid’s Tale, talks about not wanting to look at her own body. Offred shies away from wanting to look at her body because of the fact that it makes up so much of who she is: “I avoid looking down at my body, not so much because it’s shameful or immodest but because I don’t want to see it. I don’t want to look at something that determines me so completely” (61). Offed is not seen as a whole person in her society. Offred is seen purely as body, and that’s hard for her to deal with. As a woman, she wants to be seen as a feminine person like she should be. However, in the society of Gilead, the Handmaids and their bodies are only used for reproduction through the act of sex, which makes Offred not want to look at herself because she does not want to be only determined by her body....


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...sure, and intimacy becoming robotic in our world. We should make an effort to look out for this happening in our own world. By looking out for sex becoming robotic in our world, we can stop it before it even happens. Since both of these dystopian societies deal with the fact that sex is not about pleasure/love, they give our society today a warning that sadly, if we don’t pay attention, our society could end up becoming robotic in the act of sex, emotion, intimacy and pleasure. It is our responsibility to make sure that every action we take in this world is filled with emotion and intimacy, so that our society does not crumble without the things that really make up most of our humanity. Without emotions, intimacy, and having sex for pleasure, no world truly can thrive and prosper because the act of sex for pleasure, intimacy, and emotions define so much of our world.

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