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Free The Handmaid's Tale Essays and Papers

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    Handmaid's Tale

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    “The Handmaid’s Tale is set in the near future in the Republic of Gilead, A theocratic military dictatorship formed within the borders of what was formerly the United States of America.” The principles of the Bill of Rights can help the reader understand the founding principles of the Gilead. The first amendment of the Bill Of Rights is a great resource to understand what is going on in the time period of this novel. Although it is a great resource, Margaret Atwood goes against the rules of

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    The Handmaid's Tale

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    The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaids Tale, written by Margaret Attwood, goes on to explore the consequences that come to be from the reversal of womens rights in a society called Gilead. It is what one can consider a cautionary tale. In the new world of Gilead, a group of conservative religious extremists have taken power, and have turned the sexual revolution upside down. The society of Gilead is founded on what is to be considered a return to traditional values, gender roles and the subjugation

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    The Handmaid’s Tale

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    Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, like so many other dystopias before it, seeks to warn of disaster to come through the lens of its author’s society. In the breadth of its dystopian brethren, Huxley’s Brave New World and Orwell’s 1984, The Handmaid’s Tale reflects not a society destroyed, but a society reorganized to disastrous effect. The reorganization of Offred’s world is not one of simple misogyny, corruption, or political ideas, instead, as in 1984; the focus of this new world order lies

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    The Handmaid’s Tale

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    The Handmaid’s Tale The Handmaid’s Tale and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? draw on different narrative techniques to establish our relationship to their protagonists. Margaret Atwood allows the reader to share the thoughts of the main character, while Philip K. Dick makes the reader explore the mysteries behind the story. Atwood’s style works because she can directly show her readers what she wants. Dick’s opposing style works for him because he can present paradoxes and mysteries and

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    A Handmaid's Tale

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    A Handmaid's Tale A new society is created by a group of people who strengthen and maintain their power by any means necessary including torture and death. Margaret Atwood's book, A Handmaid's Tale, can be compared to the morning after a bad fight within an abusive relationship. Being surrounded by rules that must be obeyed because of being afraid of the torture that will be received. There are no other choices because there is control over what is done, who you see and talk to, and has

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    The Handmaid's Tale

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    The Handmaid's Tale Serena Joy is the most powerful female presence in the hierarchy of Gileadean women; she is the central character in the dystopian novel, signifying the foundation for the Gileadean regime. Atwood uses Serena Joy as a symbol for the present dystopian society, justifying why the society of Gilead arose and how its oppression had infiltrated the lives of unsuspecting people. Atwood individualises the character of Serena Joy, as her high status in the society demands power

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    Interpreting The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale is distinguished by its various narrative and structural divisions. It contains four different levels of narrative time: the pre-Revolution past, the time of the Revolution itself, the Gileadean period, and the post-Gileadean period (LeBihan 100). In addition, the novel is divided into two frames, both with a first person narrative. Offred's narrative makes up the first frame, while the second frame is provided by the Historical Notes, a transcript

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    In the novels ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ and ‘The Pedestrian’ we don’t see a drastic change to the laws and normalities of today’s society. In ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ the laws are an extremists version of male dominance which even today has an effect. In ‘The Pedestrian’ there is less crime, less laws (with exceptions of things like marriage) and it’s set in the future with little change to the way things are now. This statement may have some relevance to some aspects of the novels but can be regarded as

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    Feminism In The Handmaid's Tale

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    Feminism In The Handmaid's Tale Feminism as we know it began in the mid 1960's as the Women's Liberation Movement. Among its chief tenants is the idea of women's empowerment, the idea that women are capable of doing and should be allowed to do anything men can do. Feminists believe that neither sex is naturally superior. They stand behind the idea that women are inherently just as strong and intelligent as the so-called stronger sex. Many writers have taken up the cause of feminism in

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    Written Task 2: The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood seems like a feminist text which explores gender inequality in the Republic of Gilead. Women’s rights are stripped away in Gilead’s male-dominated society. Feminist movements appear to advocate for women’s rights, but reflect the gender coded foundation of Gilead too. “If you happen to be a man, sometime in the future, and you’ve made it this far,” Offred says, “please remember: you will never be subject to the temptation or feeling you must

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