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The Freedom Provieded by the First Amendment Essay

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Civilizations and empires throughout history had risen and collapsed for just one word. Some like a summer night died young, while others lasted for centuries. The word was repeated consecutively by the greatest men of all times, and their blood was shed in order to fulfill it. Starting or even before William Wallace and until our present time with the raging of the Arab Spring people have been demanding freedom. It is true that it is only one word, thus, its impact is great. People who sought independence in the United States in 1777 had clearly realized the importance of that word, and vividly insisted on in the opening of the independence declaration statement: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.” Ten years later, freedom was the first to be discussed in the First Amendment of United States Constitution “prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, impeding the free exercise of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances ”. As a result, the First Amendment people’s freedom of choosing preference religion, of expression, and demonstrating peacefully against the government had been fulfilled.
People of the old continent who were sick of the tyrannies and the dictatorships in Europe and those who wanted to start a new life found refuge in the new land was that later on called America. However, their dream of living a tranquil life was crushed by the great ...


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...dom were covered by the First Amendment. By having their rights to excercise their preferred religion, of expression and of peacefully protesting against the government, liberty was guaranteed to certain citizens of the U.S.



References
Mitchell, W. v. (2003). First Amendment Overview. Supreme Court Debates, 6(2), 36.
First Amendment to the United States Constitution. (2014, January 17). Wikipedia. Retrieved
January 28, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Amendment
First Amendment Rights. (n.d.). ushistory.org. Retrieved January 28, 2014, from
http://www.ushistory.org/gov/10b.asp
The First Amendment in History. (n.d.). The History of the First Amendment. Retrieved January
30, 2014, from http://illinoisfirstamendmentcenter.com/history



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