The Salem Witch Trials

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Church had an enormous influence on the Puritan religion. The colonist from New England had mainly come over for religious reasons because they did not agree with the Protestant Church of England. The colonist came to America in search of a new home and place to live where they could have a community based on their common religious beliefs. In their community, they had a closed society built around their church and activities. The Puritan life basically revolves around the church which influenced how they lived their everyday lives. They had to go to church twice a week, attend long sermons, and avoid dancing which was deemed as a sinful act. There were events that led up to the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Europeans strongly believed in devils practice which gave certain humans the ability to harm others in return for loyalty. The Puritan life in the village of Salem was harsh because they were dealing with the after-effects of the British war which occurred in France, a smallpox outbreak took place, and they feared attacks from a neighboring Native American Tribe. All these events led up to people having suspicions about their neighbors and the fears of anyone who was an outsider. On January 1692 the events of the Salem Witch Trials began in Salem, Massachusetts when Elizabeth (Betty) Parris age nine and Abigail Williams age eleven began to act bizarre by making odd noises, behaving in eccentric ways, and were complaining of headaches. “When a local doctor named William Griggs came to see what was wrong with the girls he diagnosed that they were bewitched. “Puritans believed that to become bewitched a WITCH must draw an individual under a spell” (ushistory.org). Dr. Griggs blamed the “Evil Hand” as the main cause for the diagno... ... middle of paper ... ....legendsofamerica.com/ma-salemcourt3.html. 2. Lewis, Jone J. "Salem Witch Trials Timeline." About.com Women's History. 2013. 13 Nov. 2013. http://womenshistory.about.com/od/witchesamerica/ss/Salem-Witch-Trials-Timeline_2.htm. 3. Lewis, Jone J. "Victims of the Salem Witch Trials." About.com Women's History. 13 Nov. 2013. http://womenshistory.about.com/od/salempeople/tp/Victims-Of-The-Salem-Witch-Trials.htm. 4. “Salem Witch Trials.” 2013. The History Channel website. 12 Nov. 2013. http://www.history.com/topics/salem-witch-trials 5. "Salem Witch Trials Facts – Witchcraft Accusations from 1692-1693." Totally History Salem Witch Trials. 14 Nov. 2013. http://totallyhistory.com/salem-witch-trials/. 6. "Salem Witch Trials - Learning Adventures." Salem Witch Trials - Learning Adventures. 13 Nov. 2013. http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schooladventures/salemwitchtrials

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