The Pros And Cons Of Love Marriages

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Throughout history, arranged marriages have had a negative connotation when compared to love marriages. Although this has been the popular idea in some parts of the world, especially the Western world, it has proven to not be accurate. Participants of arranged marriages typically have longer lasting marriages than their love marriage counterparts. When also comparing the two types of marriages, love marriages may start out as more loving than an arranged marriage, they seem to depreciate over time while in arranged marriages, the level of love increased over time (Epstein, Pandi, & Thankar, 2013). The intent of my work is to provide knowledge on the aspects of arranged and love marriages, and to state my position on the fact that arrange marriages…show more content…
It has been shown that negatives of love marriages include individualism, love produces bad choice of spouse, high divorce rates, high proportion of single mothers, lack of fathers, ill-disciplined children, drug and crime amongst young, and women are required to undertake paid work, which is seen as dishonor (Penn, 2011). Though these examples are not necessarily always going to happen, and may even be the extreme of the situation, when it comes to love marriages, the chances of these factors eventually coming into play are much higher than when compared to that of an arranged marriage. Love marriages also make it easier for individuals to choose unsuitable spouses, because they are so infatuated with their significant other at the time of their union. Arranged marriages allow the two members of the party to better understand the man or woman that they are becoming involved in, and likely have the approval of their loved ones as well, which prevents familial disputes in the…show more content…
On the other side of this argument, the non-Asians (white) saw the situation in a completely opposite light. Young white women found the idea of an arranged marriage sickening. Many even regarded arranged marriages as “akin to rape, and barbaric”. All of the respondents interviewed were British, both Asian and white, born in England and educated together in English schools. This shows how different the two groups view each other, and though they were brought up in socially the same atmosphere, neither has a mutual understanding of the others respective systems of
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